Tag Archives: Drug abuse

Sports Team Participation As A Predictor For Self-Esteem In Adolescent Females

Stephanie Campbell, Darlene Haff*, Nevada State College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/campbell.html

Abstract: This study examines how sports team participation on one, two, or three or more teams is correlated with female adolescent reports of feeling sad and/or hopeless for two or more weeks, being hit by a boyfriend, the number of sexual partners, and substance abuse using the Centers for Disease Control’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. A total of 8,280 female adolescents were drawn into the sample. Chi-square tables were used to analyze feelings of sadness and/or hopelessness for two or more weeks, being hit by a boyfriend, and the number of sexual partners. A one-way ANOVA and post hoc test were used to analyze the substance abuse index. Overall, this study found that feelings of sadness and/or hopelessness and substance abuse were significantly reduced with sports team participation. There was a non-significant increase in the percentage reported to not have been hit by a boyfriend between those who did not play on a sports team and those who played on one sports team. Lastly, females with no sex partners or a lower number of sex partners were more likely to be involved with sports team participation.

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A Review of the Relationship Between Cannabis Use and Affective Disorders

Thomas Hugh Richardson
University of Bath

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/bath.html

Abstract This paper examines the relationship between cannabis use and the affective disorders of depression, bipolar disorder, and mania. The literature is reviewed, examining both sides of the debate. The literature suggests that cannabis is most strongly related to depression in heavy use, in particular in adolescents. Cannabis may be used to self-medicate depressive symptoms, though there is little evidence that this is effective. Whilst cannabis may also be used for self-medication in bipolar disorder, it has a number of effects on the emergence, presentation, treatment, and prognosis of the illness. Cannabis use may also increase sub-clinical manic symptoms in non-clinical populations. Future research is then suggested to resolve some of the discrepancies in the literature.

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