Category Archives: Volume 8

Updated: Finding Everything in the Space of Emptiness

Rose Sexton, South Dakota State University, Leda Cempellin – Faculty Project Coordinator

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v8/sexton.html

Where Nothing has Happened Like a pair of enormous contact lenses, two giant concave stainless steel disks stare at each other across a vacant hallway. At 200 cm, they are taller than a man. Modest industrial lights illuminate the vast chamber where they are attached to the blank concrete ceiling. No shadows offer definition to this space. Instead blank white walls descend to the immaculate concrete floor. The state is reminiscent of a snowstorm and the white out conditions after which this exhibition is named. We have all seen the effect of placing two mirrors opposite to one another. An endless repetition of images is cast one inside the other into the eternity of either surface. However, by simply curving the surface of the mirrors, such as Anish Kapoor has in his installation, Double Mirror (Fig 1: http://www.studio-international.co.uk/studio-images/kapoor/3b.asp), something even more incredible and unexpected occurs upon the polished surfaces: an apparent lack of reflection. Waves of the visual spectrum are bounced off each surface both away from the opposite mirror, away from the eye of the viewer. Stand inside the double mirror. Step into the tension between them. Look up, down, left, right into the broad mirrors and be met with nothing at all!

Links updated.

Collapse of the World’s Fundamental Social Unit: Mass Media’s Tremendous Impact on Families

Kayla Groat
University of Maryland University College

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/groat.html

Abstract Our nation’s modern media acts as a devastating destructive force to the family unit in America, and its effects are felt worldwide. The rearing of children has been taken from the hands of parents into grips of mass media. Producers of mass communications render inaccurate societal depictions, and individuals respond in active accordance with what is portrayed. Media embeds messages of violence, body image, and teen sexuality, all of which encourage single parent and/or cohabitating homes out of wedlock and destroys marriages through pornography. Continuation of this family degradation cycle will result in the collapse of the family as a social function and force for stability in communities as well as on a worldwide scale.

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Black and White Students’ Quality of Life

Dawnn Mahulawde
Bowling Green State University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/mahulawde.html

Abstract The Time-Oriented Quality of Life Scale (TOQLS) was developed to measure one’s present quality of life in relationship to one’s desired future quality of life. The ten items were economics, housing, family life, education, social life, neighborhood, transportation, desired career, mental health, and physical health. The population for this study consisted of 12 elementary, 14 middle school, 13 high school, and 15 college students. Results indicated that African Americans and Caucasians did not differ in reports of present or future quality of life but that elementary students had a lower future quality compared to the other age groups. The racial differences of quality of life are discussed.

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Evaluation of a Drug Court Serving Female Prescription Drug Misusers: Relationship of Substance Use to Co-Occurring Trauma History and Symptoms

Amber Hannah, California State University, Los Angeles
M. Scott Young*, Kathleen Moore*, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute at University of South Florida

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/hannah.html

Abstract The present study examined the relationship between lifetime trauma, trauma symptoms, and substance use among female prescription drug misusers enrolled in a court supervised substance abuse treatment program. Participants were sixteen women enrolled in the Pinellas County Adult Drug Court WeCan outpatient rehabilitation program. Results indicated that lifetime exposure to trauma was associated with trauma symptoms, and trauma symptoms were in turn related to continued substance use. Implications for trauma-informed substance abuse treatment practices and future research are discussed.

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The Perceived Influence of a Father on His Daughter’s Development

Caitlin Goossen, The Master’s College

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/goossen.html

Abstract According to research conducted by Nielsen, “fathers generally have as much or more influence than mothers on many aspects of their daughters’ lives. For example, the father has the greater impact on the daughter’s ability to trust, enjoy and relate well to the males in her life …well-fathered daughters are usually more self-confident, more self-reliant, and more successful in school and in their careers than poorly-fathered daughters …Daughters with good relationships with their father are also less likely to develop eating disorders” . The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, influence a father has on his daughter’s development. The survey instrument requested demographic data in addition to seven Likert-type scale questions and was distributed to the students enrolled in The Master’s College during the spring 2009 semester. STATPAK was used to examine the data collected, and the One-Dimensional Chi-square test used to interpret the data. All responses were significant at the .05 significance level. The conclusions of this research indicate that a father does have influence over his daughter in many areas, including body image and sexuality.

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Estimating Suicide Rates in Nations that Do Not Report Suicide Statistics

Zorel Zambrano and Lawrence T. White*, Beloit College

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/zambrano.html

Abstract We report a new method to estimate suicide rates in nations that do not collect or report suicide statistics. Using indicators of suicide rates in a sample of 73 nations and standard regression techniques, we identified four predictors—divorce rate, locus of control, per capita GDP, and fertility rate—and generated different regression equations. These equations appear to produce reasonably valid estimates of national suicide rates.

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Using Photovoice as Participatory Needs Assessment with Youth at a Latino Youth Action Center

Joan Scacciaferro, Samantha Goode, Deirdra Frausto, Truman State University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/scacciaferro.html

Abstract The photovoice method allowed the youth participants (females attending programs at a Latino/Hispanic Center), as ‘experts’ on their own lives, to freely display their thoughts, needs, and concerns in an artistic manner. Through photography, this project not only promoted creativity but also offered a non-threatening platform for participants to convey true emotion and information about difficult subjects. After comparative analysis between all four participants’ pictures and responses, three common themes arose: the importance of family in their lives, the importance of technology in their lives, and the importance of the Center in their lives.

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Shamans Equal Schizophrenics

Anthony Wilkins, Texas A&M University

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/wilkins.html

Abstract The purpose of this research paper is to analyze shamanism and schizophrenia, eventually coming to the conclusion that they are one and the same. Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is the physiological link between the two, while culture is the psychological link between them. This paper goes on to suggest that the shaman is a schizophrenic.

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Effects of Sorority Participation on Artificial Tanning Habits in College Students

Allison L. Attal, Baylor University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/attal.html

Abstract The effect of sorority affiliation on artificial tanning frequencies was investigated. Variables were measured using an artificial tanning survey developed for this research. The results indicated that while the proportion of participants that had used a tanning bed at least once was higher for the sample of sorority members than for the sample of non-sorority members, there appears to be no connection between sorority affiliation and frequency of tanning bed use over the past month and past six months. That is, on a monthly and semi-annual basis, sorority members are not more likely to use a tanning bed more frequently than non-sorority members. The findings are consistent with theories of the effects of peer crowd identification and appearance motivation on artificial tanning habits.

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Special Edition: Historical Analysis of the American Civil Liberties Union “In God We Trust” and the ACLU, 1955-1959

Randy Kamcza, Bowling Green State University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/aclu/kamcza.html

Introduction The founding fathers created the framework for our country that would not be controlled by religion. When the Declaration of Independence was signed, only seven percent of the people in the thirteen colonies belonged to a church. Yet, by the 1950s the country they had created was so controlled by religion that a vote against “In God We Trust” as the national motto or a vote against “Under God” being added to the Pledge of Allegiance would be confused with a vote for communism and a vote against America. The Founding Fathers’ first amendment to the constitution stated, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” thus creating what is commonly called the Separation of Church and State (also known as Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause). Thomas Jefferson, one of the founding fathers of the United States exclaimed,

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