Category Archives: Volume 11

Healthy Eating for a Low-income Family: SNAP

Catherine Elizabeth Luedtke,
Suzy Weems*,
Janelle Walter*,
Baylor University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/luedtke.html

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate healthy nutrition options for families living at or slightly above the poverty level. A hypothetical scenario was created and used as a basis for investigating food prices and determining the availability of healthy foods using SNAP allotments. Data were collected from local chain supermarkets. Then, a budget, shopping schedule, and meal plan were developed. A SNAP allotment of $468 per month was calculated for the hypothetical family of four, and our study found that healthful food could be provided for under $440. The results showed that SNAP allotments could indeed provide adequate resources for the purchase of nourishing foods for families on a low income.

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Through the Lens of Attention Restoration Theory: The Pursuit of Learning in Gardens throughout History

Amy Thielen,
Karen R. Diller,
Washington State University Vancouver

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/thielen.html

Abstract: Attention Restoration Theory (ART), the environmental psychology framework developed by S. Kaplan, has been helpful in explaining the restorative properties of natural settings for individuals experiencing cognitive depletion. Although ART associated research has focused exclusively on discerning the restorative properties of modern day environments, we wanted to explore the restorative aspects of natural settings, specifically gardens, in the past. Notably, we wanted to examine whether the properties that made historic environments restorative for cognitive depletion also made the natural settings conducive for learning and contemplation among the historic cultures researched. By applying the properties of ART to sites in the ancient Mediterranean (Greece and Rome), Song and Yuan Dynasties in China, and Stuart through Victorian England, we seek to show how the historic environmental sites exhibited the same restorative cognitive effects of present day environments and stimulated learning and intellectual contemplation.

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Analysis of U.S. Mainstream Media: A Case Study of News Reports on Occupy Wall Street Event

Laya Liu Linjun Fan, Shantou University, Guandong, China

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/fan.html

Abstract: The “Occupy Wall Street” (OWS) movement, started from Zuccotti Park at the Wall Street in New York City on Sep.17, 2011. It expanded to 951 cities in 82 countries around the world. The U.S mainstream media’s attitude towards OWS turned from ignorance, neutral, denial, to acceptance. Keith Olbermann, American political commentator criticized the initial media response for ignorance in the first five days. Also, Chen Weihua, deputy U.S. editor of China Daily followed with a shameful “media blackout”. However, both of them failed to give comprehensive and multi-dimensional analysis except for small sample data and subjective tendencies. To give an objective view on how U.S. mainstream media defined news value by media bias detection, this thesis tracked news coverage and analyzed the content of 4 specific mainstream media on OWS from Sep.16 to Dec.16 in 2011, including 417 publications on New York Times, 268 on Wall Street Journal, 487 news coverage on CNN.com, and 286 on NPR.org. The author combined literature research with discourse analysis to conclude that U.S mainstream media didn’t have adequate reports in the beginning but followed by regular coverage with little bias. The reason for ignorance maybe owed to OWS’s unclear goal and blocking by government.

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Effect of a Brief Worksite Health Education Workshop on the Fall Prevention Knowledge of Physical Plant Employees

Justin McDermott,
Joan Scacciaferro,
Beth Antonacci,
Alaina Kramer,
Truman State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/mcdermott.html

Abstract: Because laborers are at high-risk for workplace injuries such as those from slips, trips, and falls, employee safety training for prevention of slips, trips, and falls is recommended; physical plant laborers at a small university in Missouri participated in a brief worksite health education workshop on slips, trips, and falls prevention. After completion of the workshop, participants significantly improved their knowledge of identification and reduction of slips, trips, and falls risk. When employers provide safety training programs, and employees practice safe work habits, knowledge of health risks may be increased.

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Using Personality Profiles and Gender to Predict Affect

Chelsey L. VanDyke,
Jonathan S. Gore*,
Eastern Kentucky University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/vandyke.html

Abstract: Despite the abundance of research examining the association between personality traits and affect, few researchers have examined personality profiles. The hypotheses tested in this study examined how gender, extraversion, and neuroticism interact to predict positive and negative affect. Participants (n = 2,542) completed personality and mood surveys online. Bivariate correlation analyses and hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to analyze the data. Results supported previous findings about the correlation between neuroticism, extraversion, and negative and positive affect, and people who are high on extraversion and high on neuroticism experienced the most affect variability. The correlation of extraversion and positive affect was stronger among men than women. The three-way interaction between gender, extraversion, and neuroticism showed that neuroticism is most strongly related to negative affect for men who are low in extraversion. These findings are important because they show the importance of accounting for personality profiles when predicting affect.

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Healthy Tazewell County Initiative: Implementation of the MAPP Process and Survey Findings

Erin N. Oates, Maureen Cluskey*,
Kevin Randall*,
Bradley University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/oates.html

Abstract: The Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) process, provides a way for communities to collaboratively prioritize and improve public health issues by determining gaps as well as strengths in public health services (McClellan, 2005). Results from the four assessments in step three of MAPP identify quality of life issues, efficiency of current services, observation of community health status, as well as forces of technology, laws, and other ever-developing facets that may affect how public health systems function (“National Association of City and County Health Officials,” 2012). To date no studies have been found investigating the MAPP process relative to which factors citizens perceive most important to quality of life within a community. Thus, as a research question, we investigated the most important features of a healthy community listed by residents of Tazewell County, then used the quality of life questions to predict a multi-item outcome applying hierarchical regression analysis. The results of this research found that when the Tazewell Public Health Department is seeking to implement positive change in the community they should aim to focus on living in a community that (a) has a strong overall quality of life, (b) is a good place to grow old, (c) has clean air and water, (d) has an active sense that citizens can make the community a better place individually and corporately, and (e) has pride in shared accomplishments.

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Perceptions of Service: A Case Study of Post-Earthquake Haiti

Allison Mousel,
DePauw University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/mousel.html

Abstract: This study examines the perceptions of service held by service providers in post-earthquake Haiti. Data came from a case study of a group of service providers who spent three weeks in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and analysis was performed on the responses to a questionnaire distributed to this group. Results reveal discrepancies and commonalities between self-role and perspectives and that of the other, or the projected role and perspectives of other service providers and the general local community.

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“In Cold Blood”: A Profile of the Antisocial Personality Disorder

Mary Anne Gunter, Lyon College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/gunter.html

Abstract This paper will examine how the 1967 film, “In Cold Blood,” represented the Antisocial Personality Disorder in its cinematic portrayal of the real-life serial killer Richard Hickock. At the time it was an introspective film, filmed in the actual locations surrounding the crime.

Hickock was executed in 1965 for participating in the murders for profit of a family of four in Holcomb, Kansas.

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The Digital Divide Within Education Caused by the Internet

Benjamin Todd, Acadia University, Ontario, Canada

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/todd.html

Abstract This paper examines how Internet technologies are creating a divide between the skills individuals are using inside the classroom and in their daily lives. The data were collected using an online survey that highlights the need to revaluate how individuals are now learning and the new role of teachers in the digital age.

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Workplace Ergonomics: A 3-Phase Intervention at the Workplace

Rachel Van Cleave, Jenna Osseck, Ashley Hartman, Deirdra Frausto, Alaina Kramer, Truman State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/vancleave.html

Abstract An ergonomics education needs assessment was conducted for a convenience sample of laborers in Northeast Missouri. Results demonstrated that the respondents possessed adequate ergonomics knowledge but did not seem to be able to apply their knowledge to their daily work tasks.
Trained ergonomics instructors, therefore, presented ergonomics intervention program educational workshops for those laborers and others who worked in jobs considered at high risk for ergonomic-related injuries. Significant increases (p< .05) in pre- to post-ergonomics knowledge were reported, and the majority of respondents also reported positive personal ergonomic behaviors in a 3-month post-intervention assessment.

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