Category Archives: Volume 11

Internet Addiction

Nawwaf Rashed, Kaist University, Daedeok Innopolis, Daejeon, South Korea

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/rashed.html

The Internet The Internet links computer networks all over the world by satellite and telephone, connecting users with service networks such as e-mail and the World Wide Web. The Internet has turned the Earth into a global village. People from all parts of the globe can now communicate verbally, irrespective of their geographical distances. The Internet is enabled by the advancement in technology that allows data to be transferred from one electronic device to the other with high speed. The Internet is useful in all nations; in fact, it is becoming a basic need because almost everything is conducted online. It enables fast communication, saves time, and creates effectiveness and efficiency in all sectors of life. However, Internet addiction has negatively affected users.

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Video Games

Obaid Rashed Aleghfeli, Kaist University, Daedeok Innopolis, Daejeon, South Korea

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/aleghfeli.html

At the root of the notion of video games is the word “video,” which originally meant a kind of electronic device that can show images (Stiles, 2010). In fact the first video games were sometimes called TV games. Having appeared as an experiment for human interaction, video games have changed dramatically and now have become an example of art and a form of business industry (Gladwell, 2000). All you need to have to play a video game is an input device, a joystick (or any other kind of game controller, such as a keyboard, a mouse etc.), and a particular video game. Speakers and headphones are not obligatory; they just make the effects more impressive.

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The Effect of Microbial Contamination upon the Plasticity of Ceramic Clays

John Henrikson, Ted Fleming*, Bradley University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/henrikson.html

Abstract: Relatively little evaluation has been conducted on the effects of individual microbes present in ceramic clays. In this study, bacteria present in dry ingredients and also aged clay were surveyed and identified as to the genus level using a combination of culture and microscopic techniques. Isolates of predominant bacteria were individually evaluated by reintroduction into sterile dry ingredients and aging of the wet clays. Subsequently clay samples were subjectively assessed for wet pliability and quantitatively tested for wet plasticity and shear strength after firing. Following a 10-day aging period, experimental clays were found to be 10 percent more plastic than control clays (sterile) and demonstrated 1.5 -13.2 percent lower cured shear strength. p>

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Stroop Effect Differences of Native and Non-Native Japanese Speakers

Aaron Tiesling-Rusch,
Andrew Dimond,
Beloit College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/rusch.html

Abstract: An experiment was carried out to examine the differences in Stroop effect between native Japanese speakers with knowledge of English and English speakers with knowledge of Japanese. Three separate Numeric Stroop tests were administered to participants (N = 38) in different graphemes: Japanese Kanji, Japanese Hiragana, and English Alphabet. There were no significant differences in Stroop effect between the two groups, regardless of what graphemes were used.

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Test Anxiety and Learning Potential in College Students

Nicholas Cale, Christopher Fowler*, Melisa Rempfer*, University of Missouri – Kansas City

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/cale.html

Abstract: This study examined the impact of Test Anxiety (TA) on undergraduate college students’ Learning Potential (LP). It was predicted that those students high in TA would perform poorly in comparison to students low in TA on initial testing of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), but the students would show equal testing abilities on the WCST when presented with dynamic testing. Sixty-one students completed the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI), and were then randomized into high- or low-threat conditions. Twenty-two students completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), Letter-Number Sequencing task (LNS), and the dynamic WCST. Multiple analyses of variance (ANOVA) revealed that TA did not significantly impact learning on the WCST.

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University Students’ Reflections on School Music

Diane Stjern,
North Dakota State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/stjern.html

Abstract: Many factors contribute to student attrition in school music programs. This article explores the factors most true to a group of sixty-seven university students’ as they reflect on their involvement in music throughout middle and high school. Individuals who indicated they stopped participating in their school’s music program were surveyed further to reveal their individual reasoning. The results were compared with previous research to illustrate the current factors causing student attrition in school music programs, and implications for music educators are also discussed.

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Women and Nostalgia During the American Civil War: Cursed as a Cause, Blessed as the Cure

Alicia Zuberbier,
Dr. Lori Kelly*,
Carroll College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/zuberbier.html

Abstract: During the Victorian era, women were expected to be angels of the home, likened to heavenly saints of the domestic world. They cared for the entire house, devoting their lives to the contentment of their children and husband. Women who followed in these roles had happy little families, presenting the picture perfect Victorian household. However, in 1861, the start of the American Civil War, their slice of domestic heaven crumbled. Their men left, off to face a slew of horrors, ranging from death and destruction to unmanageable diseases, nostalgia being one of them. One Civil War veteran described nostalgia–an extreme homesickness–saying it “fastens upon the breast of its prey, and sucks, vampire-like, the breath of his nostrils. Many a heroic spirit after braving death at the cannon’s mouth . . . has at length succumbed unresistingly to this vampire, Nostalgia” (Matt, “Home”). Left behind, women were trapped in a paradox by nostalgia because, in a sense, as providers of good homes they contributed to the illness. Ironically, for similar reasons, they also became an antidote. It was quickly recognized that women were a cause for the life threatening illness known as nostalgia, but as the war came to its end, they were considered to have the most impact on its cure.

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School Bullying Hurts: Evidence of Psychological and Academic Challenges among Students with Bullying Histories.

Amanda Brandt, Krishny Zaveri, Ketty Fernandez, Lauraine Jondoh,
Evelyn Duran, Lindsey Bell, Jennifer Gutierrez, Nicole Benna, Daniel Cruz, Ph.D.*,
Caldwell College

Full text: www.kon.org/urc/v11/bullying/brandt.html

Part of the URJHS Special Edition on School Bullying

Abstract: Bullying carries a lifelong series of emotional scars that permanently affect children into adulthood. Bullying is associated with depression, anxiety, and poor school performance. Yet, despite considerable evidence, the effectiveness of bullying programs remains questionable. The current study examined the impact of bullying on the psychological well-being of students and on academic achievement, specifically in the area of reading comprehension. Results indicated that bullying was strongly associated with increased psychological problems and with poor reading comprehension performance. These results suggest that bullying results in student low academic achievement and implies that bullying programs must be monitored for effectiveness and anti-bullying enforced.

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Special Edition: School Bullying

Special Edition of the
Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences

Topic: School Bullying

Undergraduate students are eligible to submit papers on the theme of School Bullying for publication in the online Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human SciencesPapers submitted for consideration may describe student projects from research awards, seminars, independent studies, service-learning projects, or class projects in the student’s major. There are no deadlines; manuscripts are posted as they are approved for publication. The page, Bullying Research Ideas  (http://chapters.kon.org/bullying-research/research-ideas), may provide a starting point for research.

About the Journal: The Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences is an online national journal dedicated to the publication of undergraduate student research. The twofold purpose of the journal is to foster and reward the scholarly efforts of undergraduate human sciences students as well as to provide a valuable learning experience. The articles represent primarily the work of the undergraduate student(s). Faculty members, who deserve recognition, are identified by an asterisk next to their names. Undergraduate research not only bridges the gap between knowledge and experience but has the benefit of laying the groundwork for career exploration and development. The opportunity for undergraduates to publish in a national journal is an added value to the overall educational experience and to the process of self-discovery. The articles published in this journal will reflect appropriate scope and complexity for excellent undergraduate work. The basis for accepting papers for publication is the agreement among reviewers that the project and design are strong representatives of introductory level research.

Objectives: This theme serves one or more of these purposes: (a) assesses the impacts of bullying in the school setting; (b) evaluates action taken by individuals, families, schools, and communities that contributes to and/or ameliorates school bullying; (c) considers the place of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender in relation to school bullying; (d) examines action taken by families and schools that prevents cyberbullying; and (e) proposes courses of action to bring an end to school bullying.

Overview: Kappa Omicron Nu launched the Bullying – Service Learning Initiative in August 2012 as part of its Social Responsibility theme. The Bullying Service-Learning Initiative Website provides background information and resources for service-learning programs and research related to the problem of bullying as it exists in schools throughout the United States. Kappa Omicron Nu chapters and other student and community groups are invited to use this Website.

Because society is transformed most productively from the bottom up in the spheres of environmental, social, and economic change, Kappa Omicron Nu chapters and other student groups have an opportunity to make an impact in the larger community. The objective of this Bullying Initiative is to create conditions that make it possible for all individuals to get along and function better in or out of the school setting.

A Safe Place to Start Over: The Role of Design in Domestic Violence Shelters

Sarah M. Kesler,
Kansas State University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/kesler.html

Abstract: This literary analysis explores the design of crisis centers and shelter housing, specifically focusing on those organizations serving victims of domestic violence. It investigates the housing needs of people who are connected to the shelter and its function, such as victims of domestic violence, their children, the administrative workers, and also the abuser. It examines the shelter itself by identifying the various types of space used by victims living in the shelter and how each space affects users of the facility. It also considers which aspects of shelter design influence users most, such as privacy and security, the ability to control their environment, and the effects of the transition from a familiar place to a new location. Information on the design of shelters and the services provided is not readily available (Pable, 2010; Correia & Melbin, 2005). Research specifically about centers that serve victims of domestic violence and their children is even more difficult to come by. To gain a wider perspective and better understanding of the subject, research on homeless shelters and transitional housing was included in the review. In order to more accurately see the role of a crisis center in victims’ lives, staff members from a local crisis center were interviewed to gain insight into the procedures of the shelter environment. It was discovered that design has an enormous impact on both victims residing in the shelter and administrative staff who work there. The design, space planning and functionality of the shelter affect victims psychologically, as well as physically and emotionally impacting them (Baker, Cook, & Norris, 2003). By using the conclusions found through research to improve shelter environments, victims have a better chance of recovering from their crisis situation and becoming successful members of society.

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