Category Archives: Research Papers

Respecting Cultural Differences: Alternatives for the Amish Community to Combat Health Care Costs

Christopher B. Sherman
University of Tampa

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/sherman.html

Abstract: Medical bills represent a growing concern for the Amish population. Their unique culture compels them to decline any government funding for medical care and deters them from purchasing insurance. Like any one, individuals in the Amish community occasionally incur health care issues. Yet, unlike the general population, the Amish are far more likely to encounter a particular disease called Crigler-Najjar Syndrome. Undoubtedly, this situation results in significant difficulties for the Amish to pay the extraordinary out-of-pocket costs associated with medical bills, given their limited monetary funds. Solutions to this seemingly impossible situation include reduced monthly payments, lump sum alternatives, food services, and trading commodities.

Continue reading

Exploring Identities in Motion in Diasporic and Global Literature

Matthew Russo
Loyola University Chicago

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/russo.html

Abstract: The increasing ease with which individuals can move across the globe provides more opportunities for people to explore the world, but it also results in the displacement of some individuals from their native countries or “homelands.” This displacement, referred to as diaspora, is certainly not a new concept; however, the problem becomes exacerbated in an age of globalization. Two specific novels, Aleksander Hemon’s The Lazarus Project and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, provide narratives focused on characters in the midst of what sociologist Robin Cohen refers to as a “victim diaspora,” but my reading of the novels suggests a slightly different view of diaspora than that suggested by Cohen (28). Particularly, I argue that the main character of each story is not necessarily searching for a lost “homeland” but rather reshaping or altering identity in response to the respective diaspora.

Continue reading

AirAsia’s Application of the ‘Thirty-Six Stratagems’

Wong Wei Mei
Central China Normal University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/wong-weimei.html

Abstract: Based on the ”36 Stratagems” (三十六计)—a compilation of strategies from the China Warring States Era, this paper analyses the transfer of military strategies into the corporate setting of AirAsia. The ”36 Stratagems” plan offers new perspectives about how to form creative strategies in today’s dynamic business landscape with similar characteristics to ancient Chinese warfare, particularly for the aviation industry surrounding AirAsia in South-East Asia. This paper illuminates the different ways AirAsia utilised one of the stratagems during the global economic crisis in 2008 and how the low-cost carrier adapted the stratagem to the business model and market condition.

Continue reading

Healthcare Safety Net in 2030

Stephen P. Petzinger, George Mason University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v13/petzinger.html

Abstract As the United States embarks on massive health care reform through the continued implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), policy makers must look to the future with unrelenting support for greater access to care. Albert Einstein (1946), one of the greatest intellectuals of all time, once said, ” . . . a new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move toward higher levels.” How does a health care system, with such deep-rooted principles of profit making and inefficiency, accomplish such lofty aspirations? Balabanova et al. (2013) argued, policy makers need to realize the complexity of the US health care system and that no simple recipe exists for success. No one can accurately predict the state of our health care system 17 years from now or what role the safety-net system will play to increase access to care. However, this author does know that if we ignore or sublimate such important questions, we will be much worse off than we are today.

Continue reading

Catastrophe and Change: Living in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

Justine A. Von Arb, Olivet Nazarene University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/von-arb.html

Abstract: This paper considers the catastrophic occurrence of Hurricane Katrina and investigates the social changes that resulted. The criteria for catastrophe are presented, including the disruption of normal life. The possibility that better preventative measures could have been instituted is explored, primarily with regard to governmental measures that failed due to a lack of an accurate perception of both the threat and the efficacy of the proposed solutions, and the immediate responses of the victims are noted. Although devastation ravaged the cities and the lives of those impacted by Hurricane Katrina, each day is an opportunity for the victims to adapt to the changes that were forced upon them.

Continue reading

Narcissistic Object Choice in Sexual Orientation Identity Development: A Freudian Perspective on Homosexual Identity Formation

Neil Gleason:
St. Olaf College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/gleason.html

Abstract: Within the field of LGBT psychology, several models of homosexual orientation identity development have been proposed, and most of these models emphasize the importance of assuming a non-heterosexual identity. Freud’s theories of homosexuality are reinterpreted and integrated into these contemporary models in order to shed light on both the importance of non-heterosexual identity formation and the complications that can arise from it. Specifically, Freud’s concepts of “narcissistic object choice” and “identification” reveal how homosexual individuals can form paradoxical attachments with heterosexual objects, and how these paradoxes can be resolved through the assumption of a homosexual identity.

Continue reading

Regulation of an Emerging Medical Treatment

Caitlyn Reese, Fort Lewis College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/reese.html

Abstract:In the past decade, scientific studies have shown that adult stem cells may have the potential to treat dozens of degenerative diseases and change the future of medicine. However, some private companies have preemptively begun using adult stem cells in unregulated human trials, and the FDA has been forced to shut down several facilities across the U.S. Regulation of this new biotechnology is necessary in the interest of public safety because there is not yet enough clinical evidence to support current use of adult stem cells.

Continue reading

Redefining Power: How the Chinese Communist Party can adapt to a new reality and survive in the 21st Century

Zachary Ochoa, James Madison University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/ochoa.html

Abstract:The Chinese Community Party has maintained a firm grip on Chinese Society for over half a century. Recently, it has overseen the dramatic rise of China in the realms of economics, military power, and international relations. However, these advances also come with risks, and the CCP may actually find itself in a more vulnerable position as time goes on. The author examines these risks and hypothesizes on how the CCP can adapt to meet these new challenges.

Continue reading

Improving Science through Data Management and Sharing

Kathryn A. Kane, Washington State University Vancouver

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/kane.html

Introduction:Professor Alexandra Bennett is in charge of a typical lab at a large university that studies the surface characteristics of semiconductors. The outcomes of research inform industry developers to build better electronic devices. Within this lab group, doctoral students are engaged in their own individual projects and are responsible for recording and archiving their results. However, there is no standardized system to digitally store and access research data. This is mostly due to the lack of familiarity with data storage among the researchers combined with different working styles. It makes it difficult for doctoral students to share related data with each other, much less with researchers outside of their institution, since recordkeeping is so idiosyncratic. Professor Bennett remarks, “It scares me how much data was lost (sic) because it wasn’t well organized.” (Akmon, Daniels, Hedstrom, & Zimmerman, 2011, p. 337).

Continue reading

I Can Fix That: Manageable Factors in Patient Rehabilitation and Recovery

Michelle Mathews, University of Texas

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/mathews.html

Abstract Recovering from injury and debilitation is a gruesome process for any patient. It is painful, unpleasant, and uncomfortable. It is the responsibility of staff in the health care industry to make it their number one priority to make the recovery process as easy and stress-free as possible for patients. If all the factors affecting recovery were to be determined and categorized, they could then be turned into manageable methods of regulating and speeding up the recovery process. By understanding what factors influence rehabilitation, we can further our attempts in making the recovery process more efficient, encouraging, positive, and comfortable for patients.

Continue reading