Category Archives: Research Manuscripts

Exploring Suicidal Ideation in College Students

Melanie Mann, Bonnie Ahn*, Lolita Boykin*, Southeastern Louisiana University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v15/mann.html

Abstract: The goal of this study is to provide insight into the challenges that college students with suicidal thoughts face as a marginalized group and to yield information that will expand the existing body of knowledge regarding this topic. The study was based on the collective experiences of three college students and the language constructed by them during in-depth interviews. Results suggest that these interviewees experienced pain and suffering over a prolonged period of time inspiring thoughts of suicide. All participants stated that they did not want to be thought of negatively or misunderstood, so they didn’t talk about it on campus or to their parents. It is crucial for the general college student population and mental health professionals to recognize and validate the struggles of these students, particularly during crisis. Advocacy in colleges and universities will take on special importance as more students with special needs, particularly those with mental health issues make the transition from secondary to postsecondary education. The experiences of these three participants are important and meaningful; however they may not necessarily be representative of the greater populations.

Read the full manuscript: Exploring Suicidal Ideation in College Students

Efficacy of a Group Treatment for Children with Significant Social Skills Deficits

Molly M. Parsons, Stacey S. Park, Lee A. Rosén*, Colorado State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/parsons.html

Abstract: This study examined the effectiveness of an eight session, outpatient social skills group therapy treatment for children with significant social skills deficits. The curriculum was designed to teach nine specific social skills including: Eye Contact, Personal Space, Self-Emotions, Other-Emotions, Pedantic Speech, Greetings, Conversations, Friendliness, and Play Skills. Seven elementary aged children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and/or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder participated. Parents were asked to fill out the Child Social Skills Inventory, which measures these nine social skills domains at two time points: the first day of social skills group (SSG) and the last day of SSG. Results indicate that the treatment was partially effective in improving social skills – pre to post changes in the domain of Self-Emotion were significant. In addition, the domains of Play Skills and Other-Emotion showed improvement near statistical significance. Improvement in these important social skill domains helps substantiate the efficacy of social skills group therapy treatment for children with severe social skill deficits.

Read the full manuscript: Efficacy of a Group Treatment for Children with Significant Social Skills Deficits

Personality Types and Physical Touch

Zachary Prather & Jenna Bates, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/prather.html

Abstract: The following research is a study looking at the correlation between Myers-Briggs personality types and apprehension or acceptance of physical touch. The participants of the study varied in age and gender, gathered from Facebook and Huntington University’s campus, a small Christian university in the Midwestern United States. We hypothesized that people with the E and F personality type would be the most willing to instigate and accept physical touch, with people with the I and T personality type having the most apprehension to instigating and accepting physical touch. We predicted that extroverts would be more inclined because they are typically more sociable and get their energy from people, while introverts would be less inclined because they are typically more reserved and people drain energy from them. We also hypothesized that people with the F personality type would be more inclined to accept and initiate physical touch because of their predisposition to sympathizing with other people’s emotions, while people with the T personality type are less likely to sympathize with other people’s emotions.

Read the full manuscript: Personality Types and Physical Touch

Benefits of Biophilic Design Explored Through Human Ecology

Melissa Montgomery, Kansas State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/montgomery.html

Abstract: Technology has influenced the world in many positive ways. I researched and examined the question of how technology effects communication? Technology is great for communication when it comes to connecting with family and friends who live far away. But what are the effects of say: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, text messaging, etc. on every day face-to-face conversation? This paper explores the possibility of how increased exposure to communicating pathways may actually lessen communication. Mobile technology is anything one can do on phones. Due to smartphones and the availability of them one can access the internet, therefore being able to do countless things on their phones. So the research is inclusive to texting or voice calls, but also includes the countless applications one can download on a phone. Unfortunately, research shows that mobile technology is affecting communication in a negative way when it comes to sociability and face-to-face communication. Researchers have found that mobile technology can decrease communication and intimacy. The results too many research studies seem to point out is that mobile technology lessens social interaction and face-to-face communication do to the availability of stimulants online, which requires less outside stimulants such as interaction and body-to-body sociability. Not only does mobile technology decrease social isolation it seems that internet usage can cause feelings of loneliness and busyness as well.

Read the full manuscript: Benefits of Biophilic Design Explored Through Human Ecology

Mobile Technology: Its Effect on Face-to-Face Communication and Interpersonal Interaction

Lucas Lengacher, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/lengacher.html

Abstract: Technology has influenced the world in many positive ways. I researched and examined the question of how technology effects communication? Technology is great for communication when it comes to connecting with family and friends who live far away. But what are the effects of say: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, text messaging, etc. on every day face-to-face conversation? This paper explores the possibility of how increased exposure to communicating pathways may actually lessen communication. Mobile technology is anything one can do on phones. Due to smartphones and the availability of them one can access the internet, therefore being able to do countless things on their phones. So the research is inclusive to texting or voice calls, but also includes the countless applications one can download on a phone. Unfortunately, research shows that mobile technology is affecting communication in a negative way when it comes to sociability and face-to-face communication. Researchers have found that mobile technology can decrease communication and intimacy. The results too many research studies seem to point out is that mobile technology lessens social interaction and face-to-face communication do to the availability of stimulants online, which requires less outside stimulants such as interaction and body-to-body sociability. Not only does mobile technology decrease social isolation it seems that internet usage can cause feelings of loneliness and busyness as well.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/lengacher.html

Religion’s Effect on Gender Roles

Maris Headrick, Madison Johnson, Megan Reynolds, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/headrick.html

Abstract: This research on Christianity as a religion effects on gender roles and gender stereotypes details a survey performed at Huntington University. With direct correlation between the historical, cultural, and economic ties from region to gender roles this research. While correlation is present, it is not as high of correlation expected.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/headrick.html

Adult Sibling Relationships: College Students Perspective

Katelyn M. Hughes, Abel Gitimu Waithaka*, Youngstown State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/hughes.html

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence adult sibling relationships from college students’ perspectives. Data were collected from 211 adult students, 153 female and 58 male participants. The participants completed two scales: ARQ-S scale with 47 items and the Adult Attachment (AA) Scale with 18 items. There was a significant difference in sibling relationships on high and low attachment and also on participant’s parental marital status, married or divorced parents.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/hughes.html

Religiosity and its Effects on Risky Behavior

Ashley Conrad, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/conrad.html

Abstract: By measuring religiosity and accountability, this research calculated whether or not these variables had an affect on risky behavior such as drinking underage. By looking at the importance of religiosity, accountability, peers, and family in college-age students, the study found if there was a significance between the variables and a student’s decision to participate in risky behavior.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/conrad.html

Debunking False Perceptions of Feminism

Niles Berry, Nathaniel Cave, Hannah DeMara, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/berry.html

Abstract: During the time of our undergraduate studies we discovered inconsistencies in modern understanding of Feminism. Being from predominately rural communities we were curious to discover if there was any indication of how our rural or urban lives shaped our understanding of Modern Feminism. The purpose of this study was to attempt to discover any correlation between rural upbringing and perceptions of feminism. We developed and used a survey that attempted to find individual’s beliefs on Modern Feminism. We hypothesized that there would be some kind of correlation between rural versus urban environment and misperceptions of Modern Feminism. Our finding only loosely supported our hypothesis.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/berry.html

Assessing the Value of the Day Time Nap among Preschools: An Exploratory Study

Syndee Brown, Southeastern Louisiana University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/brown.html

Abstract: Recent literature has cited that day time sleeping (i.e. nap) is critical for preschool children in many areas of development: cognitive, physical, and psycho-social (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill 2006; Sadeh, Gruber, & Raviv, 2003; and Williams & Horst, 2014). Because of the academic demands placed on early childhood educators, a debate regarding the value of nap time has been quietly brewing among some administrators (Rebecca Spencer, personal communication, August 2014). The purpose of this study was to assess various attitudes of preschool teachers and administrators regarding nap time, and to learn more about the structure of nap time among various preschool settings.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/brown.html