Monthly Archives: August 2016

Experiencing Rural Morocco Through Healthcare

Lydia George, Dr. Amy Way*, Lock Haven University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v15/george.html

Abstract: An international service-learning program to Morocco consisted of students and faculty from Lock Haven University and was conducted in 2009, 2010, 2012, and 2014 for a week at a time. Data was collected from different populations in Morocco and was analyzed based on the populations’ height, weight, BMI, blood pressure, and chief complaints. The populations were then compared to each other, to the national health of Morocco, and to the United States.

Read the full manuscript: Experiencing Rural Morocco Through Healthcare

The Beautiful and the Damned: Exploring the Negative Side of Masculine Attractiveness in Hiring Situations

Spencer L. Turner, Sean C. Willman, Robert R. Wright, Ph.D.*, Brigham Young University–Idaho

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v15/turner.html

Abstract: Although attractiveness can be an asset in many different situations, in some cases, attractiveness can produce negative outcomes in the workplace, which is known as the “beauty is beastly” effect (Heilman & Saruwatari, 1979). This study sought to explore this effect among men in hypothetical hiring decisions using two photos of men that varied in perceived attractiveness. Two-Way ANOVA results showed that the male attractive candidate was rated less favorably among male participant-raters while the average candidate received higher ratings from same-gender participants (F[1, 125] = 8.05, p = .005, η2 = .061). These findings highlight the possibility of male same-gender discrimination based on attractiveness, which is important given that many men will be evaluated by same-gender colleagues throughout their careers.

Read the full manuscript: The Beautiful and the Damned: Exploring the Negative Side of Masculine Attractiveness in Hiring Situations

A Critical Case Study of Teacher Education Student Created Memes

Sarah Swafford, Gary Padgett*, University of North Alabama

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v15/swafford.html

Abstract: From Facebook to Twitter, social media has introduced the world to memes. Memes are an innovative way to express an opinion or show true feelings without feeling pressured to answer in a certain way. The methodology related to using internet memes has been around for almost 20 years (Downes, S., 1999; Heylighen, F., 1996; Knobel, M., & Lankshear, C., 2007), but no one has yet combined it with the field of education research. Colleges of Education are already reaching out to students via Twitter and Instagram, so using memes to gather information from students is a logical next step. This article demonstrates how this has been done to improve teacher education programs.

Read the full manuscript: A Critical Case Study of Teacher Education Student Created Memes