Direct Human Service Experience and Its Effect on Volunteers’ Self-Perceived Generosity and Meeting Volunteer Expectations

Emily M. Borger, Olivet Nazarene University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/borger.html

Abstract: A study using participants (n=61) from a small liberal arts college was conducted to analyze the effect of direct human service on volunteers’ self-perceived generosity, expected versus actual appreciation, expected versus actual satisfaction in work, and expected versus actual value of work. An experimental group (n=31) was given pre- and post-surveys evaluating these dependent variables before and after treatment of participation in direct human service at a free community lunch program and was compared to a control group (n=30). It was found that there was a significant difference in the reported self-perception of generosity in the pre-surveys between the control group (M=15.17) and experimental group (M=16.52), t(59) =-2.02, p<.05, in the expected satisfaction between the control (M=15.40) and experimental (M=18.61) groups, t(59) = -4.48, p<.01, in actual satisfaction between the control (M=16.53) and experimental (M=19.17) groups, t(58) = -3.53, p<.01, between the expected value of work in the control group (M=10.33) and the experimental groups (M=12.29), t(59) = -3.91, p<.01, and between the actual value of work between the control group (M=9.73) and the experimental group (M=12.35), t(59) = -4.26, p<.01. These results indicate higher expectations from people who were engaged in direct human service compared to controls and higher values of satisfaction and value in work after service compared to controls, which may lead them back to service in the future.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/borger.html