Monthly Archives: January 2015

Lifestyle Behaviors among Students at a Historically Black University

Michelle Hill, Shawnee Sweeney, Bridgett Clinton-Scott*, University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES)

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/hill.html

Abstract: This study expands the knowledge about lifestyle behaviors among college students. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the health habits of college males and females. Participants anonymously answered a brief questionnaire that included questions about their current eating habits and physical activity level. Previous research indicated that females are more likely to possess healthier habits than males because of their interest in body image, prior nutrition education, and use of nutrition labels. The results of this study revealed that college male students possessed healthier habits than females. The males consumed more fruits and vegetables, read nutrition labels, and made better choices in their beverage selections. This study supported a common correlation in which college students, both male and female, meet the recommendation for physical activity. It was concluded that gaining the proper nutrition education can motivate college students to make healthier lifestyle choices that can continue into future years.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/hill.html

Fashion and Social Media

Daniesha Crews, Kortne Smith, Bridgett Clinton-Scott*, University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES)

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/crews.html

Abstract: This study expands knowledge about female college students’ social media usage by examining how fashion majors and non-fashion majors use social media to communicate. Participants were asked to respond to a questionnaire focusing on how they use social media. The questions related to level of interest in fashion upon social media, social media duration use, regular activities on social media, social networking preferences, and fashion involvement. The results revealed that the level of interest in fashion upon social networking sites for female fashion majors and female non-fashion majors is not drastically different; in fact both use social media for their fashion interest. Interests included exploring current fashion trends, interacting with fashion brands, and gaining information. This study suggests that college students use social media as a means of entertainment, information, and social connection.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/crews.html

Direct Human Service Experience and Its Effect on Volunteers’ Self-Perceived Generosity and Meeting Volunteer Expectations

Emily M. Borger, Olivet Nazarene University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/borger.html

Abstract: A study using participants (n=61) from a small liberal arts college was conducted to analyze the effect of direct human service on volunteers’ self-perceived generosity, expected versus actual appreciation, expected versus actual satisfaction in work, and expected versus actual value of work. An experimental group (n=31) was given pre- and post-surveys evaluating these dependent variables before and after treatment of participation in direct human service at a free community lunch program and was compared to a control group (n=30). It was found that there was a significant difference in the reported self-perception of generosity in the pre-surveys between the control group (M=15.17) and experimental group (M=16.52), t(59) =-2.02, p<.05, in the expected satisfaction between the control (M=15.40) and experimental (M=18.61) groups, t(59) = -4.48, p<.01, in actual satisfaction between the control (M=16.53) and experimental (M=19.17) groups, t(58) = -3.53, p<.01, between the expected value of work in the control group (M=10.33) and the experimental groups (M=12.29), t(59) = -3.91, p<.01, and between the actual value of work between the control group (M=9.73) and the experimental group (M=12.35), t(59) = -4.26, p<.01. These results indicate higher expectations from people who were engaged in direct human service compared to controls and higher values of satisfaction and value in work after service compared to controls, which may lead them back to service in the future.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/borger.html

Case Analysis of Harriet’s Choice

Alina Misiunas, Newberry College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/misiunas.html

Abstract: This paper examined the choice of Harriet and looks at three different formulations of Kant’s theory of deontology to show that Harriet deserves moral praise for his actions. A business scenario is then compared to the basis on which praiseworthiness was established from Harriet’s case.

Using Kant’s theory of deontology, this paper examines praiseworthiness in the case known as Harriet’s choice. The case involves two people simultaneously drowning 50 meters apart from one another and Harriet chose to save the life of the person she thought inherently most valuable. The question is, based on her choice, would Harriet be entitled to moral praise under Kant’s theory? Stansbury and Sonenshein (2011) define praiseworthiness as, “…a subset of all honorable behaviors, specifically those actions that contribute to the good life of individuals and the communities within which they live and work” (p. 7). Three questions will be asked: is it possible to make her choice into a universal law; does her choice reflect her desire to not use a human to further her own means; and was her choice hypocritical. These questions will be reviewed in the conclusion to summarize Harriet’s praiseworthiness (Kant, 1785).

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/misiunas.html

Effects of an Afterschool Program to Prevent Bullying on Violence Prevention Beliefs and Behaviors: A Pilot Study

Cassandra Hester, Alaina Kramer, Kaitlyn McManus, Cody Campbell, Brandon Stewart, Truman State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/hester.html

Abstract: In a rural school district with some of the highest rates of bullying in the state, the Aggressors, Victims, and Bystanders: Thinking and Acting to Prevent Violence classroom-based program (AVB) was implemented in an afterschool program setting and delivered using community-based personnel because of lack of time and staffing in the regular school day schedule. High-risk middle school student participants enrolled in an afterschool program for academic support completed the Pre-Post AVB Survey instrument before the first lesson of the 12-lesson AVB curriculum and immediately following the last lesson of the curriculum.

Participants’ significantly increased their overall confidence that they could prevent violence in their school and lives, significantly decreased their beliefs that support violence, and significantly decreased their behaviors supportive of violence (p <.001). Although the program was developed to be implemented as a school-based intervention, in urban areas, and taught by school personnel; this study has provided data to suggest that it may also be effective in the rural, afterschool setting and taught by non-school personnel.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v14/hester.html