Monthly Archives: July 2014

The Effectiveness of Model-Lead-Test and a Break Card with Hand-over-Hand Tracing on the Handwriting for a High School Student with Autism

Emalia C. Steele, Mika S. Aoyama, Jennifer M. Neyman*, T. F. McLaughlin* – Gonzaga University, and Kim Hatch*- Spokane Public Schools

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/steele.html

Abstract: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Model-Lead-Test (MLT) procedure on letter size and legibility for lowercase alphabetical letters. The participant was a 15-year-old male high school student. A multiple baseline design across three sets of letters was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention. A break card procedure and hand-over-hand prompting was added five sessions after the first intervention to improve his writing. These changes produced large gains in his handwriting. When this procedure was added to the next set of letters, increases in performance took place. However, for three sessions for this set of letters, the participant was unable to improve his handwriting performance. A multiple baseline design across three sets of letters to the midline, above the midline, and below the midline was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention. The participant’s ability to demonstrate appropriate size and form of lowercase alphabetical letters was found. Unfortunately, intervention on Set 3 did not occur. The procedures were easy to implement and employ in the classroom setting.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/steele.html

The Heart’s Hand in Creativity: The Effect of Coherence™ Meditation

Beau D. Kissler, Christina M. Frederick – Sierra Nevada College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/kissler.html

Abstract: The Coherence Technique™ is meditation wherein individuals generate positive feelings (e.g., appreciation) while attending their heart area (McCraty & Childre, 2002). Positive emotions improve creativity (Magno, 2011; Kauffman, 2003) and adaptive problem solving (Friedman, Förster, & Denzler, 2007). Coherence is expedited when monitoring progress using the Institute of HeartMath’s biofeedback device, the EmWave Desktop Monitor™ (McCraty, 2002). The current study examines the relationship between meditation and creativity. 43 undergraduates, aged 18-30, were assigned to 1 of 3 groups (non-, medium-, and high-coherence). The non-coherence group completed an intellectually demanding academic test prior to a 10-minute creativity test focused on unique idea generation (Macleod, 2009). Medium- and high-coherence participants were trained using the quick coherence technique and an EmWave™ biofeedback monitor. The medium-coherence group included participants who could not maintain high coherence for 3 minutes, uninterrupted. Participants who could maintain high coherence for 3 minutes, qualified for the high-coherence group. Immediately after coherence training, medium- and high-coherence participants completed the creativity test. Creativity test performance was categorized by coherence group. Differences in median test scores between these groups were assessed using the non-parametric alternative to the one-way ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis (Ryan & Joiner, 2005). Results show no significant difference (H = .66, p = .882) in creativity between coherence groups. Although short-term meditation does not increase creativity, these results encourage use of longitudinal designs when researching wellness practices.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/kissler.html

Children’s Perceptions of Maternal Weight-Related Attitudes and Behaviors and Relationship to Child’s Self-Esteem and Body Image

Lauren Sowers, Esther Higginbottom, Heather Rapp – Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/sowers.html

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to research the correlation between daughters’ accounts of mothers’ weight-related behaviors and attitudes, such as dieting, scale-checking, and comments about self, and the effects that these behaviors have on their daughters. The research was conducted by looking into parent-child relationships, how they communicate, and how the daughters perceive their mother’s views of self through use of a survey created on Survey Monkey. The subjects were 171 female students, ages 18-25, from a small Christian, liberal arts school in Indiana, and they received the survey through their university email. There was no significant relationship found between self-esteem and maternal weight-related attitudes and behaviors.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/sowers.html

The Effects of Kinesio Taping for Pain Management

Drew Slocum
California University of Pennsylvania

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/slocum.html

Abstract: Kinesio tape is an elastic, adhesive-backed cotton tape that was created in the late 1970’s by Dr. Kenzo Kase of Japan to treat athletic injuries and aid in athletic performance. Aiding in athletic performance includes pain reduction, neuromuscular system re-education, performance optimization, injury prevention, and the promotion of improved circulation and healing. The specific purpose of this review is to determine the effectiveness of kinesio taping on pain reduction. Musculoskeletal pain affects athletes in a negative manner and can lead to a decrease in athletic performance. Numerous studies were reviewed to determine the pain reducing effects of kinesio tape on musculoskeletal injuries that include subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendonitis, patellofemoral pain syndrome, mechanical neck pain, and Achilles tendinosis. In conclusion, the studies conducted determined that kinesio tape does have an effect on pain reduction but the exact physiological cause is unknown. Although the results hypothesize that kinesio tape affects the gate control theory, more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of kinesio taping on the reduction of pain management.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/slocum.html