Monthly Archives: January 2014

Teachers’ Context Beliefs about Implementing the CCSS

Carly Maloney, Idaho State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/maloney.html

Abstract: Whenever a reform takes place in the field of education, questions arise concerning implementation of the change in classrooms. The current educational shift to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative, proposed and adopted in 45 states is no different. The CCSS were created to prepare students to become more college and career-ready in both English Language Arts and Mathematics. In preparation for teaching the CCSS, educators from districts across Idaho are and will continue to participate in professional development training, developing an understanding of what has been deemed the ICS (Idaho Core Standards)–including becoming familiar with the architecture and then creating various unit plans for implementation. The purpose of this study was to measure one part of teachers’ personal agency beliefs–the context (environmental) beliefs–that might support teachers’ implementation of the ICS. It was concluded that, on average, participants had high context belief scores, indicating that they believed their environments were supportive of and responsive to ICS implementation.

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Catastrophe and Change: Living in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

Justine A. Von Arb, Olivet Nazarene University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/von-arb.html

Abstract: This paper considers the catastrophic occurrence of Hurricane Katrina and investigates the social changes that resulted. The criteria for catastrophe are presented, including the disruption of normal life. The possibility that better preventative measures could have been instituted is explored, primarily with regard to governmental measures that failed due to a lack of an accurate perception of both the threat and the efficacy of the proposed solutions, and the immediate responses of the victims are noted. Although devastation ravaged the cities and the lives of those impacted by Hurricane Katrina, each day is an opportunity for the victims to adapt to the changes that were forced upon them.

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Healthy Tazewell County Initiative: Variations in Community Quality of Life, Health Problems, and Risky Behaviors by Age Category

Alyssa Carlson, Angela Stegmaier, Maureen Cluskey*, G. Kevin Randall*, Bradley University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/carlson.html

Abstract: The MAPP process, a strategic planning tool that allows communities to prioritize their public health issues, was employed by the Tazewell County Health Department to assess what factors residents perceived to be (a) the most important for community quality of life, (b) the greatest health problems, and (c) the top risky behaviors impacting community health.

Data, collected through an online survey, were provided by 456 participants residing in the county and at least 18 years of age. First, we conducted a frequency analysis on the top three factors for community quality of life, health problems, and risky behaviors as nominated by participants. Second, we assessed whether or not the factors differed by age groups/cohorts: 25-34, 35-44, 45-55, 55-64, and those over 65.

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A Tale as Old as Time – An analysis of negative stereotypes in Disney Princess Movies

Jolene Ewert, Montana State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/ewert.html

Abstract: The Disney Corporation has been entertaining families with animated films since the 1930s. Disney princesses have gained notoriety over the years and even received their own line of products in the 1990s. Disney princess movies and related products have brought in billions of dollars through sales. Disney is a household name, and children all around the world are familiar with the movies. Through content analysis, this study examined the ways in which negative stereotypes are reinforced in Disney princess movies and the effects those stereotypes have on young, impressionable minds.

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