Monthly Archives: September 2013

The Relationship between Personality Traits and Compulsive Buying

Justin R. Bivens, Jonathan S. Gore*, Sytisha Claycomb*, Eastern Kentucky University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/bivens.html

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between personality traits and compulsive buying. We hypothesized that extraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism, and conscientiousness all uniquely relate to compulsive buying. Data were gathered from 369 undergraduate students who signed in to an online data gathering system and read an informed consent statement before filling out the questionnaires. The results showed that people with high levels of neuroticism and extraversion and low levels of conscientiousness tend to have more compulsive buying tendencies. Recommendations are suggested about evaluating potential consumers through a personality profile prior to the establishment of credit.

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Motives that Predict Liking and the Usage of Facebook

Ashley E. Bohnert, Jennifer L. Hughes, Lexi Pulice-Farrow, Agnes Scott College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/bohnert.html

Abstract: Facebook has become one of the most popular social networking sites. A survey of 666 users was used to determine motives that were predictors of liking and usage of Facebook. The study was based on self-reports of users through an online survey, and participants were recruited by research assistants. Two hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to examine possible motives for liking and usage of Facebook. The significant motives found for liking Facebook were keeping in touch, occupying time, sharing information, people watching, and entertainment. The significant motives found for Facebook usage included occupying time, sharing information, and venting. The findings of this study increase the understanding of motives that contribute to liking and usage of Facebook.

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The Relation Between Text Medium and Critical Reading Scores (2012)

Troy Mott, Christina Frederick*, Sierra Nevada College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/mott.html

Abstract: Post-secondary educational institutions have incorporated tablets in the educational curriculum (Woodford, 2001). To investigate how reading medium impacts critical reading ability, I performed two studies. In the first study, participants read an SAT practice test passage (Mathur, 2012) from either paper or an iPad 2 tablet. The identical passages were 949 words. Once the reading was complete, participants responded to 12 critical reading assessment questions about the passage. 116 participants completed the critical reading assessment study. A second study, a self-response survey, which examined the reading preferences and demographics (gender and age) of 115 participants was also conducted. A two-way ANOVA was used to analyze the results of the critical reading comprehension test. No significant difference was found between critical reading comprehension scores between mediums and academic standing (p = .911). The self-response survey was assessed using a chi-square analysis. There was no significant difference in preference between upper and lower division undergraduates (p = .157). Females showed a stronger preference for reading from paper than males (p = .045), and a significant preference was found among the total sample population for reading from paper over other surveyed forms of media (p < 0.001). The implications of this study are relevant to the future of education and sustainability efforts in the classroom.

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Information Comprehension: Handwritten vs. Typed Notes

Karen S. Duran and Christina M. Frederick* , Sierra Nevada College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/duran.html

Abstract: Ever advancing trends in technology, and implemented in educational settings, inspired the current study, which examined the impact, on comprehension, of note-taking method. 72 undergraduate participants, aged 18-26, viewed a projected documentary in a classroom setting and took notes for a later assessment via either paper or computer keyboard. The Mann-Whitney U (Ryan & Joiner, 2001) showed a significant difference between the test scores produced via typed notes and written notes (p = .006). Experimental and survey results converge and dictate that the best and preferred practice for student note taking is writing.

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How Undergraduate Research Became More Than a Resumé Enhancement

Olivia Means

The 2012 Summer Research Institute at the Florida Mental Health Research Institute (SRI@FMHI) was my introduction to the research process. The most exciting thing about this experience was the opportunity to develop my own research study. I really had to spend time thinking about what I was interested in researching. I thought about my past experiences and I realized I was interested in how people access health care services and how certain barriers prevent people from gaining adequate care.

What I enjoyed most about my project, Barriers to Seeking Help for Mental Health Issues in Women Ages 22 – 64, was the opportunity to speak with women about their mental health issues, hiding symptoms and difficulties accessing care. I remember spending a lot of time at the homeless facility where I recruited one group of participants. Many of the women were uncomfortable sharing their mental health diagnosis or needed help filling out the questionnaire, so I talked with them and waited patiently until they were ready to share. After completing the questionnaire, one woman thanked me. I thought she was referring to the compensation, but then she said, "It’s just nice to know that someone is asking these questions." Another woman from my University sample group commented that she learned so much about herself by participating in my study. I was so pleased to hear comments like these.

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