Monthly Archives: July 2013

Efficacy of Individual Nutrition Counseling on Resting Energy Expenditure, Oxygen Consumption, Fat-Free Mass, and Percentage Fat of Body Weight

Afton Kechter, Jeanette Davidson*, G. Kevin Randall*, Bradley University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/kechter.html

Abstract:There is agreement that optimizing intake of calories, protein, and carbohydrates to fuel muscle will enable athletes to train harder, but translating nutrition knowledge into nutrition behavior is problematic. The efficacy of individual nutrition counseling (INC) on nutrition behavior using objective measurements in competitive athletes has not been investigated. We therefore evaluated the influence of INC on the objective outcomes: oxygen consumption (VO2) at rest, resting energy expenditure (REE) measured by indirect calorimetry, fat-free mass (FFM), and percentage fat of body weight (PF) measured by tetra-polar bioelectrical impedance in varsity cross-country athletes at three time points of pre-during-& post-season.

Continue reading

Assessing Middle School Students Need for a School Counselor

Michele R. Schmalzel, Siena Heights University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/schmalzel.html

Abstract:School counselors provide a range of services to students and can be particularly beneficial to middle school students, who are in a period of adjustment and change (Maples et al., 2005). These students may deal with difficulties such as family and or social problems, depression, and bullying. Thirty-five middle school students in a private Catholic school were surveyed to determine their feelings about school counselors. (The school currently does not have a school counselor.) In this study I examined whether students would be interested in having a school counselor available to them and what benefits they believed a school counselor could provide. The students surveyed have little experience with, or knowledge of, school counselors. Results showed the students have an interest in a school counselor and would be willing to see a counselor. Students also demonstrate an awareness that fellow students could benefit from a school counselor. 

Continue reading

Across Hemispheres: Comparing Interhemispheric Transfer Times of Japanese and Americans

Andrew J. Dimond and Aaron Tiesling-Rusch, Beloit College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/dimond.html

Abstract:This study sought to determine whether hemispheric differences in language processing would lead to differences in interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT), the time it takes for information to be transmitted from one hemisphere of the brain to the other, between English speaking Americans and Japanese speakers in Japan. Compared to English, reading and writing Japanese requires more bilateral brain activity, and as a result may impact IHTT in a manner similar to previous findings regarding people that frequently play an instrument. We recruited participants from both the United States and Japan and used a manual response reaction time task to estimate the participants’ IHTT. We found that there was no cross-cultural difference in the IHTT of American and Japanese participants, which indicates the possibility that the results from other IHTT studies, which only used Americans, may be generalizable to other national groups.

Continue reading

Comparison of Aluminum Mordanted and Nonmordanted Wool and Cotton Dyed with Walnut

Kelsie Doty, Kansas State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/doty.html

Abstract:The purpose of this research was to compare mordanted and nonmordanted cotton and wool fabrics, dyed with black walnut (Juglans nigra) leaves, hulls, and bark for colorfastness properties. Half of the cotton fabrics were mordanted with aluminum acetate and half of the wool fabrics were mordanted with potassium aluminum sulfate. Colorfastness to laundry and light for both cotton and wool were improved with the use of an aluminum mordant. However, the use of a mordant changed the color from a cool (blue) and dull brown to a warmer (yellow) and brighter brown. Overall, walnut bark dyed wool had the highest ratings for both fastness to laundry and light.

Continue reading

Regulation of an Emerging Medical Treatment

Caitlyn Reese, Fort Lewis College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/reese.html

Abstract:In the past decade, scientific studies have shown that adult stem cells may have the potential to treat dozens of degenerative diseases and change the future of medicine. However, some private companies have preemptively begun using adult stem cells in unregulated human trials, and the FDA has been forced to shut down several facilities across the U.S. Regulation of this new biotechnology is necessary in the interest of public safety because there is not yet enough clinical evidence to support current use of adult stem cells.

Continue reading

Relationship Satisfaction, Confidence, and Outness in Lesbian-Identified Facebook Users

Lexi Pulice-Farrow, Jennifer L. Hughes, and Ashley E. Bohnert, Agnes Scott College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/pulice-farrow.html

Abstract:For this research we evaluated the relationships of 55 lesbian-identified Facebook users. We hypothesized that Lesbian-identified romantic partners who linked their partners would report greater relationship satisfaction than those who did not (H1). We also hypothesized that there would be a positive relationship found for lesbian-identified Facebook users for their relationship satisfaction and degree of outness (H2). Next, we hypothesized that Lesbian-identified romantic partners who did not link their partners on Facebook would report less relationship confidence than partners who had linked their partners (H3). Finally, if a user linked her partner, we hypothesized that she would be more likely to post and tag photographs with her partner (H4).

Continue reading

Redefining Power: How the Chinese Communist Party can adapt to a new reality and survive in the 21st Century

Zachary Ochoa, James Madison University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/ochoa.html

Abstract:The Chinese Community Party has maintained a firm grip on Chinese Society for over half a century. Recently, it has overseen the dramatic rise of China in the realms of economics, military power, and international relations. However, these advances also come with risks, and the CCP may actually find itself in a more vulnerable position as time goes on. The author examines these risks and hypothesizes on how the CCP can adapt to meet these new challenges.

Continue reading

Improving Science through Data Management and Sharing

Kathryn A. Kane, Washington State University Vancouver

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/kane.html

Introduction:Professor Alexandra Bennett is in charge of a typical lab at a large university that studies the surface characteristics of semiconductors. The outcomes of research inform industry developers to build better electronic devices. Within this lab group, doctoral students are engaged in their own individual projects and are responsible for recording and archiving their results. However, there is no standardized system to digitally store and access research data. This is mostly due to the lack of familiarity with data storage among the researchers combined with different working styles. It makes it difficult for doctoral students to share related data with each other, much less with researchers outside of their institution, since recordkeeping is so idiosyncratic. Professor Bennett remarks, “It scares me how much data was lost (sic) because it wasn’t well organized.” (Akmon, Daniels, Hedstrom, & Zimmerman, 2011, p. 337).

Continue reading

The Mediating Role of Credit Card Misuse on Collegiate Compulsive Buying: A Replication Study

Cynthia Dublin, Chang-Ok Choi*, G. Kevin Randall*, Bradley University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/dublin.html

AbstractThe average age at onset of compulsive buying is 18-24 years. This study replicates Palan, Morrow, Trapp, and Blackburn (2011) who investigated credit card misuse as a mediator between self-esteem, power prestige, and risk taking for compulsive buying behavior in undergraduate business majors. In addition to including all majors at Bradley and both sexes, we controlled for personality, a known covariate for credit card misuse and compulsive buying.

Continue reading

I Can Fix That: Manageable Factors in Patient Rehabilitation and Recovery

Michelle Mathews, University of Texas

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/mathews.html

Abstract Recovering from injury and debilitation is a gruesome process for any patient. It is painful, unpleasant, and uncomfortable. It is the responsibility of staff in the health care industry to make it their number one priority to make the recovery process as easy and stress-free as possible for patients. If all the factors affecting recovery were to be determined and categorized, they could then be turned into manageable methods of regulating and speeding up the recovery process. By understanding what factors influence rehabilitation, we can further our attempts in making the recovery process more efficient, encouraging, positive, and comfortable for patients.

Continue reading