Definitions of Dating Violence among African American College Students: Their Relationships with Gender Role Beliefs

Tara Bremond, Joseph Cannatella, Bonnie Ahn*, Hyunsook Kang*
Southeastern Louisiana University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/bremond.html

Abstract The purpose of this study was to further expand the understanding of how gender role beliefs influence African American college students’ definition of dating violence. The research design employed a cross-sectional survey approach utilizing the purposive sample of 116 African American undergraduate students (62 men and 54 women) at a university in southern Louisiana. It was found that there is a significant difference between African American male and female college students in their gender role beliefs; no significant statistical difference in their definition of dating violence; and a significant relationship between gender role beliefs and definitions of dating violence. The researchers recommend macro-level public awareness campaigns targeting attitudinal changes by collaborative efforts of African American community leaders.

Introduction Violence in dating relationships is a widespread problem on college campuses (Murray & Kardatzke, 2007). According to the U.S. Department of Justice (2012), dating violence is defined as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic nature with the victim. Strauss confirmed that “Dating violence is a pervasive and serious problem worldwide”(as cited in Chiung-Tao Shen, Yu-Lung Chiu, & Gao, 2012).

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/bremond.html