Monthly Archives: May 2013

Effects of Person Organization Fit on Satisfaction, Commitment, and Turnover

Vishakha Gupta, University of Puget Sound

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/gupta.html

Abstract This literature review analyzed studies on Person Organization (P-O) fit and outcome variables (satisfaction, commitment, and turnover) conducted in the past 12 years. The aim of this study was to answer questions regarding the relationship of P-O fit with satisfaction, commitment and turnover. PsychInfo and PsychArticle were used to locate studies in the past 12 years that included P-O fit and at least one outcome variable (satisfaction, commitment, or turnover). Results show that P-O fit does predict satisfaction, commitment, and turnover.

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After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the works of Junot Díaz

Grant Glass, Harvard University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/glass.html

Abstract This paper discusses where and how Díaz positions himself within a Latino identity, and how his narrative style incorporates his sense of Latino culture specifically in The Brief Life of Oscar Wao (2007) and Drown (1996).

Introduction Junot Díaz began his first novel, The Brief Life of Oscar Wao (2007) with an epigraph, a poem from the Saint Lucian born Derek Walcott. The poem, “The Schooner Flight” (1980) described the complicated affirmation of identity: “. . . and either I’m nobody or I’m a nation.” Díaz understood that this quote had far reaching implications beyond just the framing of the novel but in positioning his work to a larger group. The question became what group, and even further what identity was he claiming? Was it American, Hispanic, Dominican, or Latino? Only by carefully reading the literary style of Díaz in which he executes his narrative would he reveal what his association was and how that association functioned. Not only did Díaz use poetry to inform and frame his novel, he also used the same device to frame his short story collections.

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Quasi-revolution in psychology and reproducibility of extraordinary results

Artem Akopyan,The University of Western Ontario

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/akopyan2.html

Abstract This article deals with the issue of reliability in contemporary research. Specifically, the idea of purposeful replications of psychological studies is discussed. Next, the two main types of replication are presented and their pertinence to psychology is explained in connection with Darryl Bem’s (2011) notorious article that claimed overwhelming evidence of precognition. The reader is shown the potential shortcomings that might come about as a result of neglecting literal replications or misinterpreting the results obtained with the help of each form of replication Finally, some modern changes in research practices in psychology are mentioned and their significance in scientific testing and theorizing are briefly outlined.

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Correlates of Weight Perceptions among Adolescents

Gene Oliverius, Darlene Haff*,Nevada State College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/oliverius.html

Abstract This study of weight perceptions among adolescents used data from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System to analyze the bivariate relationships between self-image, depressive symptomatology, physical activity, and attempts to change perceived weight differences. Results show a statistically significant relationship between overweight perceptions and trying to lose weight, as well as relationships between feeling sad / helpless and perception of weight and between days of activity and perception of weight. The manuscript concludes with a discussion stressing the importance of education for adolescents in improving self-image.

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Is the Socioemotional Quality of Emergent Reading Interactions Related to Young Children’s Emergent Reading Skills?

Symonne S. Kennedy,
Stephanie M. Curenton*,
Rutgers University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/kennedy.html

Abstract Emergent reading is an important developmental milestone wherein young children read familiar books to a parent or teacher. Few inquiries have been made about how the quality of emergent reading interactions are associated with children’s concurrent emergent reading performance or their standardized reading skills. The current study addresses this gap by investigating the association between the socioemotional quality of parent-child emergent reading interactions and children’s emergent reading skills on a standardized test of reading and an emergent reading rubric. Sixteen boys and 14 girls 36-60 months of age (M=48.90, SD=8.92) were recorded reading The Snowy Day by Ezra J. Keats to their mothers. An emergent reading rubric was developed based on children’s extra-textual comments during the emergent reading interaction and a standardized early reading assessment was administered to the children before the interaction. The mothers and children’s socioemotional contributions to the emergent reading interaction were used to assess the socioemotional quality of the interaction. Mother’s level of Balanced Control-Redirection as well as children’s Task Orientation-Compliance were both significantly and positively associated with children’s emergent reading rubric scores. Children’s Task Orientation-Compliance was significantly and positively associated with mothers’ level of Balanced Control-Redirection. These results suggest that mothers’ behavior during emergent reading interactions can influence children’s concurrent emergent reading performance; however, this influence does not extend to standardized scores on early reading assessments.

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Youth Empowerment: How College Students Can Affect Peacekeeping

Lauren Candemeres,
University of Tampa

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/candemeres.html

Abstract This research questions how increasing the awareness of college students on topics such as military action and foreign relations affects how the United States conducts peacekeeping. Although there is much research available on topics such as the growing disconnect between the military in America and civil society and the media’s influence over public opinion, there is very little information on how these issues have influenced each other, how they have affected our youth, and how peacekeeping operations are conducted throughout the world. How have we gotten to where we are today in terms of peacekeeping and what can we do to improve those conditions? To discover how college students view peacekeeping, a survey was made available on survey monkey in which students answered questions about what they thought would be the most successful forms of peacekeeping, and why or why not they thought education should be increased on this topic. The survey received very positive feedback, with unanimous support for increasing education for a variety of reasons. These findings reveal the need for more research and more action regarding increasing awareness of college students on military and foreign affairs.

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The Implications of α-synuclein in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

Kelly M. Wilmas,
University of Texas at Austin

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/wilmas.html

Abstract This purpose of this research is to provide valuable information regarding the pathways that cause aggregation of the α-synuclein protein in brain nerve terminals, causing neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction, in order to diagnose Parkinson’s disease early and provide effective treatment. Studies have shown that the idiopathic form of Parkinson’s is strongly associated with changes in α-syn expression due to mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms, which causes aggregation of α-syn protein into amyloid deposits in brain nerve terminals. Familial Parkinson’s disease is due to autosomal-dominant inheritance of the mutated α-syn. Thus, α-syn is thought to play a fundamental role in the genetic etiology of Parkinson’s and can possibly be targeted in order to treat the disease. In order to gather more evidence of this, I compiled primary and review research articles on the genetic mechanisms of this protein. In this review, I provide an overview of known interactions of the protein with the environment, genes, and aging process. I also include significant findings that improve our understanding of possible treatment options, targeting α-synuclein, for this debilitating disease.

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Definitions of Dating Violence among African American College Students: Their Relationships with Gender Role Beliefs

Tara Bremond, Joseph Cannatella, Bonnie Ahn*, Hyunsook Kang*
Southeastern Louisiana University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/bremond.html

Abstract The purpose of this study was to further expand the understanding of how gender role beliefs influence African American college students’ definition of dating violence. The research design employed a cross-sectional survey approach utilizing the purposive sample of 116 African American undergraduate students (62 men and 54 women) at a university in southern Louisiana. It was found that there is a significant difference between African American male and female college students in their gender role beliefs; no significant statistical difference in their definition of dating violence; and a significant relationship between gender role beliefs and definitions of dating violence. The researchers recommend macro-level public awareness campaigns targeting attitudinal changes by collaborative efforts of African American community leaders.

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Re-balancing or Counter-balancing? Assessing America’s Response to China’s Rise through Bilateral Investment Treaties

Esther Tran-Le, New York University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/tran-le.html

Abstract The rise of China as an economic powerhouse with an aggressive leadership challenges America’s status as world superpower. In an international system increasingly dominated by economic relations, scholars have determined that specific international trade measures support strategic policy objectives.

My research addresses whether the United States government seeks to counterbalance China’s growing economic influence through bilateral investment treaties (BITs) in a certain set of countries. Using a logit regression, I show that Washington is trailing China and signing BITs with the same countries. However, running the same logit regression for Canada and Italy, I show that they too are signing BITs with the same countries as China. Because following China’s BITs is not unique to the United States, there is not enough evidence to conclude that the American government is using BITs as a strategic tool to counterbalance Beijing. Rather, the United States, Canada, Italy, and China are engaging in normal, competitive trade.

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Bullying on Facebook: How It Affects Secondary School and College Students

Emily Salinas, Deana Coan, Sara Ansley, Andrew Barton, Caleb McCaig,
Tarleton State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/salinas.html

Abstract Social networking websites have contributed to a new kind of bullying–cyberbullying. In this study, we investigated how cyberbullying via Facebook affects students transitioning from high school to college and if bullying persists after that time period. The purpose of this study was to better understand how bullying emerges from interpersonal communication on social networking websites.

In order to accomplish the purpose of our study, we proposed the following research questions: “How does bullying through Facebook affect students?” and “How do the effects of bullying through social networking impact academic performance in school?”

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