Monthly Archives: April 2013

Defining the Causes of Educational Achievement: The Effect of Social Capital on the Educational Achievement of Youth

Johnny De Vito, New York University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/devito.html

Abstract As our economy evolves to demand a higher skilled, better-educated workforce, it is critical to discover and assess the causes of educational achievement among young people. Income level, parental involvement, community capital, race, truancy, and a number of other factors have been posed as possible determinants. Using the National Education Longitudinal Study, this research examined how social capital affects educational achievement on a high school and post-secondary level. This study concluded that high levels of social capital found in parents and communities affect educational achievement, even after accounting for income, parental education, and student attendance.

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An Examination of Imperialism in Edith Wharton’s Travel Writing

Christine Kelley, Elizabethtown College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/kelley.html

Introduction Edith Wharton, one of the greatest fiction writers of the 20th century and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Age of Innocence, was not only talented at crafting stories but was also renowned for her travel writing. A body of her travel literature centers around her experiences in France, her opinion of their culture, and her observations on the lives of French women. By using Mary Louise Pratt’s Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation to make a critical evaluation, it becomes apparent that Wharton’s travel writing, though useful for the growing tourism industry in the early 20th century, showed a biased preference for France, which lauds the “superiority” for French culture over the more “primitive” French colony of Morocco. Edith Wharton Abroad: Selected Travel Writings 1888-1920 excerpts essential chapters from Wharton’s Motor Flight through Paris and In Morocco.

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Athletes and Pulmonary Embolism

Aimee N. Thompson,
California University of Pennsylvania

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/akopyan.html

Abstract A pulmonary embolism is an obstruction of one or more arteries in the lungs. In most cases, a pulmonary embolism is caused by a blood clot that travels to the lungs from another part of the body. Due to the severity of a pulmonary embolism, various complications such as difficulty breathing, heart failure, or death may occur. Blood clots typically are uncommon in young, healthy individuals. Athletes are generally healthy and well-conditioned individuals but can be at a greater risk of developing a pulmonary embolism because symptoms may be misinterpreted by something less serious and become undiagnosed. This study discussed the leading causes of pulmonary emboli and determined whether or not they related to one another in the athletic population. Current clinical research suggests that post-surgical complications, genetic mutations, protein deficiencies, and oral contraceptives are leading causes of pulmonary emboli. This study compared the leading causes of pulmonary emboli in the athletic population and determined what predisposed them to this pathology.

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Time Flies When You’re Having Fun: The Influence of Continuous Attention on the Perception of Time

Chelsea Donaldson, Briana Paulman, University of Oklahoma

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/donaldson.html

Abstract Attentional models of time perception suggest that when more attention is given to non-temporal information processing, less attentional resources are allocated to temporal processing, which results in misperceptions of time. The current study sought to support these models through manipulating attention toward a slideshow, and thus indirectly manipulating the allocated attention toward temporal processing. Although two groups viewed a slideshow of the same duration (102 seconds), the continuous attention group viewed 52 pictures at two seconds each, while the non-continuous attention group viewed 17 pictures at two seconds each plus four-second blank screen intervals between pictures. In accordance with attentional models, we predicted that continuous attention toward the slideshow would result in less accurate time estimations compared to the condition that included blank screen intervals.

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Prevention and Treatment of Pediatric and Adolescent Overuse Injuries

Kaitlyn Sippel, California University of Pennsylvania

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/sippel.html

Abstract Today, children do not participate in interscholastic sports alone; they are also members of club teams and travel teams outside of interscholastic play that are year round. Thus, the body is not allowed to fully rest before continuing to the next sport season. Overuse injuries can affect multiple parts of a young athletes’ body including the physis’ and the tendons. Because these overuse injuries affect multiple parts of the body, there are different ways to treat and prevent these injuries. An overview of the most common overuse injuries is presented with the most reciprocated ways to prevent each injury, therefore the purpose of this literature review is to investigate the current preventative measures and treatments for pediatric and adolescent overuse injuries.

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Identifying Dominant Personality Traits

Kirstie L. Bash and Lynn S. Urban,
University of Central Missouri

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/bash.html

Abstract Determining dominant personality traits among students enables personality to be matched with the “best fit” for career placement, as well as to match student personalities with faculty personalities. This research aims to establish literature on criminal justice student personality traits and to determine scores on personality inventories. Results from analyzing data from 124 criminal justice and 67 psychology students, using an independent measures t-test for the Big Five personality scores, suggest that overlapping career paths is responsible for similar scores on personality inventories. Dominant personality traits were not observed in the results; however, this research provides a foundation on personality research for criminal justice students.

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Barriers to Seeking Help for Mental Health Issues in Women Ages 22 – 64

Olivia Means,
Mary Armstrong*,
Kathleen Moore*,
University of South Florida

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/means.html

Abstract The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to make more comprehensive health care services available and affordable. However, if barriers other than affordability exist and are not addressed, the newly available services will continue to be under-utilized. Using a theoretical framework of help-seeking behavior, the two research questions are: (a) To what extent do barriers other than affordability exist in women accessing mental health care services? and (b) To what extent do the identified barriers affect help-seeking behavior? For this pilot study we surveyed women, who ranged in age (22-64), employment status, type of health insurance, and mental health diagnosis.

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Differential Effect of Age with Immigration Status on Junk Food Intake

Kisha Thakur, Thomas Wootton High School, Rockville, MD

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/highschool/thakur3.html

Introduction Obesity has become a major public health policy issue in the United States (Hook, Balistreri, & Baker, 2009). As stated in The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion publication, “OBESITY: Halting the epidemic by making health easier at glance,” prevalence of obesity in the last three decades doubled among adults and tripled among children (CDC, 2011). About $147 billion was spent in medical care expenditures for obesity-related conditions in the United States. Moore and colleagues (2009) list a number of studies linking the consumption of junk food to obesity. Targeting obesity-related intervention and prevention efforts to subpopulations at greater risk of junk food consumption will efficiently reduce overall health care costs and health problems in the United States.

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