Monthly Archives: January 2013

Testing Scientific Claim At Own Risk: Reproducibility Against Novelty

Artem Akopyan, The University of Western Ontario

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/akopyan.html

Abstract The article discusses the problem of validation by means of independent replication. Bem’s studies of precognition are discussed in that context, as well as the recognized measure of implicit attitudes, the Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP). Subsequently, a review of LeBel’s replication of Payne, Hall, Cameron, and Bishara (2010) is presented. Finally, important replication-oriented initiatives are outlined.

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Does Junk Food Intake Vary With Immigration Status?

Kisha Thakur, Thomas Wootton High School, Rockville, MD

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/highschool/thakur.html

Introduction This study examines the variation in junk food intake with immigration status. Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity related health problems, obesity has become a major public health policy issue in the United States (Hook, Balistreri, and Baker, 2009). Moore and colleagues (2009) cited a number of studies demonstrating that the consumption of junk food leads to obesity. Identifying subpopulations with higher junk food consumption will better target the intervention and prevention efforts aimed at alleviating the prevalence of obesity and will thereby efficiently reduce overall health-care costs and health problems in the United States.

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Psychological and Legal Evaluation of a “Totality” Versus “Per Se” Approach to Juvenile Offenders

Kelsey Ball, University of Virginia

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/ball.html

Introduction As a culturally accepted rule, juveniles are treated differently from adults and are often denied the executive right to make important, life-changing decisions. Due to a presumed lack of experience, maturity, and intellectual capacity, parents and other officials often limit juveniles’ rights to make decisions in an effort to avoid potential social consequences and/or negative repercussions to the adolescent. The presumption that adolescents cannot make sound decisions on their own is supported by various neuro-psychological studies illustrating developmental differences between adolescent and adult brains. These differences are particularly salient in the frontal cortex that is shown to moderate executive functions, such as inhibiting inappropriate behaviors (Begley, 2000). Because of the differences in brain development and cognitive maturity, adolescent decision-making on important issues such as health care, education, and custody is often facilitated by a parent or guardian. All the more, with life-changing decisions relating to criminal offenses, one would expect the implementation of similar precautionary measures with regard to adolescent decision-making; however, this is not the case. Numerous legal cases in the past show the unfortunate outcomes of unassisted juvenile decision-making in police interrogations, highlighting the prevalence of a “totality of circumstances” approach which gives courts complete discretion in determining whether or not a juvenile voluntarily waived their Miranda rights.

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Social Capital Development in Hispanic Communities

Kathleen G. Westwood, Devyani Chandran*,St. Olaf College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v12/westwood.html

Abstract This article examines the development and sustainability of social capital in local Hispanic communities. Researchers collaborated with a local organization in a Midwestern state in order to explore the development of social capital programs that serve Hispanic populations in two program sites. This qualitative study examined the development of bonding and bridging social capital in Hispanic communities, identified barriers to the development of social capital in these communities, and made suggestions for improving social capital programs through leadership development, language exchanges, and cultural engagement. Implications are discussed for future planning in local communities that could lead to a smoother integration of migrant populations in local communities.

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Contemporary Marimba: Trends in Composition

James Peter Millican, North Dakota State University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v12/millican.html

Abstract It is important for music educators and composers to know the common techniques used to compose for marimba in order to write music for the instrument. In this article I will analyze contemporary marimba literature to support the common compositional techniques used for the instrument. I will also discuss progressive ideas of contemporary composition for the instrument, marimba technique, and electronic enhancement.

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