Monthly Archives: December 2012

Internet Addiction

Nawwaf Rashed, Kaist University, Daedeok Innopolis, Daejeon, South Korea

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/rashed.html

The Internet The Internet links computer networks all over the world by satellite and telephone, connecting users with service networks such as e-mail and the World Wide Web. The Internet has turned the Earth into a global village. People from all parts of the globe can now communicate verbally, irrespective of their geographical distances. The Internet is enabled by the advancement in technology that allows data to be transferred from one electronic device to the other with high speed. The Internet is useful in all nations; in fact, it is becoming a basic need because almost everything is conducted online. It enables fast communication, saves time, and creates effectiveness and efficiency in all sectors of life. However, Internet addiction has negatively affected users.

Continue reading

Video Games

Obaid Rashed Aleghfeli, Kaist University, Daedeok Innopolis, Daejeon, South Korea

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/aleghfeli.html

At the root of the notion of video games is the word “video,” which originally meant a kind of electronic device that can show images (Stiles, 2010). In fact the first video games were sometimes called TV games. Having appeared as an experiment for human interaction, video games have changed dramatically and now have become an example of art and a form of business industry (Gladwell, 2000). All you need to have to play a video game is an input device, a joystick (or any other kind of game controller, such as a keyboard, a mouse etc.), and a particular video game. Speakers and headphones are not obligatory; they just make the effects more impressive.

Continue reading

The Effect of Microbial Contamination upon the Plasticity of Ceramic Clays

John Henrikson, Ted Fleming*, Bradley University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/henrikson.html

Abstract: Relatively little evaluation has been conducted on the effects of individual microbes present in ceramic clays. In this study, bacteria present in dry ingredients and also aged clay were surveyed and identified as to the genus level using a combination of culture and microscopic techniques. Isolates of predominant bacteria were individually evaluated by reintroduction into sterile dry ingredients and aging of the wet clays. Subsequently clay samples were subjectively assessed for wet pliability and quantitatively tested for wet plasticity and shear strength after firing. Following a 10-day aging period, experimental clays were found to be 10 percent more plastic than control clays (sterile) and demonstrated 1.5 -13.2 percent lower cured shear strength. p>

Continue reading

Stroop Effect Differences of Native and Non-Native Japanese Speakers

Aaron Tiesling-Rusch,
Andrew Dimond,
Beloit College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/rusch.html

Abstract: An experiment was carried out to examine the differences in Stroop effect between native Japanese speakers with knowledge of English and English speakers with knowledge of Japanese. Three separate Numeric Stroop tests were administered to participants (N = 38) in different graphemes: Japanese Kanji, Japanese Hiragana, and English Alphabet. There were no significant differences in Stroop effect between the two groups, regardless of what graphemes were used.

Continue reading

Test Anxiety and Learning Potential in College Students

Nicholas Cale, Christopher Fowler*, Melisa Rempfer*, University of Missouri – Kansas City

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/cale.html

Abstract: This study examined the impact of Test Anxiety (TA) on undergraduate college students’ Learning Potential (LP). It was predicted that those students high in TA would perform poorly in comparison to students low in TA on initial testing of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), but the students would show equal testing abilities on the WCST when presented with dynamic testing. Sixty-one students completed the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI), and were then randomized into high- or low-threat conditions. Twenty-two students completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), Letter-Number Sequencing task (LNS), and the dynamic WCST. Multiple analyses of variance (ANOVA) revealed that TA did not significantly impact learning on the WCST.

Continue reading

University Students’ Reflections on School Music

Diane Stjern,
North Dakota State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/stjern.html

Abstract: Many factors contribute to student attrition in school music programs. This article explores the factors most true to a group of sixty-seven university students’ as they reflect on their involvement in music throughout middle and high school. Individuals who indicated they stopped participating in their school’s music program were surveyed further to reveal their individual reasoning. The results were compared with previous research to illustrate the current factors causing student attrition in school music programs, and implications for music educators are also discussed.

Continue reading