Monthly Archives: September 2012

“In Cold Blood”: A Profile of the Antisocial Personality Disorder

Mary Anne Gunter, Lyon College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/gunter.html

Abstract This paper will examine how the 1967 film, “In Cold Blood,” represented the Antisocial Personality Disorder in its cinematic portrayal of the real-life serial killer Richard Hickock. At the time it was an introspective film, filmed in the actual locations surrounding the crime.

Hickock was executed in 1965 for participating in the murders for profit of a family of four in Holcomb, Kansas.

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The Digital Divide Within Education Caused by the Internet

Benjamin Todd, Acadia University, Ontario, Canada

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/todd.html

Abstract This paper examines how Internet technologies are creating a divide between the skills individuals are using inside the classroom and in their daily lives. The data were collected using an online survey that highlights the need to revaluate how individuals are now learning and the new role of teachers in the digital age.

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Workplace Ergonomics: A 3-Phase Intervention at the Workplace

Rachel Van Cleave, Jenna Osseck, Ashley Hartman, Deirdra Frausto, Alaina Kramer, Truman State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/vancleave.html

Abstract An ergonomics education needs assessment was conducted for a convenience sample of laborers in Northeast Missouri. Results demonstrated that the respondents possessed adequate ergonomics knowledge but did not seem to be able to apply their knowledge to their daily work tasks.
Trained ergonomics instructors, therefore, presented ergonomics intervention program educational workshops for those laborers and others who worked in jobs considered at high risk for ergonomic-related injuries. Significant increases (p< .05) in pre- to post-ergonomics knowledge were reported, and the majority of respondents also reported positive personal ergonomic behaviors in a 3-month post-intervention assessment.

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Half a Nation! – Financial Inclusion Lessons for India

Nazuk Kumar, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/kumar.html

Abstract Today India may boast of 7-8 percent GDP growth but still 50 percent of the population lives below the international poverty line. The economic success of India is a representation of less than half the nation. Imagine the growth possible if the other half is integrated into the mainstream economy. Financial inclusion is the key for this. This study was conducted during May-July 2011 at the Reserve Bank of India, Chandigarh, India. Financial inclusion in India is very poor with 51.4 percent of 89.3 million farmer households being excluded from any source of credit. A cross-country comparison of India with Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, France, Indonesia and Philippines has been conducted. A door-to-door survey was carried out in three relatively prosperous villages in Panchkula district of Haryana, a state where officially the financial inclusion programme has largely been successful. Results show that although most households have a bank account, these are hardly used. Thus the financial inclusion policy, where successfully implemented has addressed access; however comprehensive financial inclusion, including access to services like credit, savings, insurance, pension plans, has not been achieved. Thus right from the policy level the aim should be “usage” with better implementation and not mere “access.” A different approach for India has been suggested for tackling this problem.

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Advocating Genital Autonomy: Methods of Intactivism in the United States

Travis Wisdom,
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/wisdom.html

Abstract This project investigates the methods employed by activists in the genital autonomy movement in the United States. “Intactivists” advocate the inalienable right of humans (and children in particular) to have intact genitals, free from any unnecessary or damaging modifications without their fully informed consent. For this project, I conducted structured interviews with sixteen self-identified intactivists to identify the primary methods they use to advocate for genital autonomy. Participants advocate the principle of autonomy by disseminating information about (a) the intact body and functions of the genitals; (b) the damages of genital surgeries that worsen with age; and (c) the ethical dilemmas associated with all medically unnecessary genital modifications.

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Postnatal Environmental Influences on Rat Dam Maternal Behavior and Offspring Anxiety

John M. Preslik, University of California, Berkeley

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/preslik.html

Abstract Variations in maternal care are associated with the development of individual differences in behavioral and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responses to stress in the rat. Environmental stressors can influence maternal care, and hidden variables can be problematic for research in behavioral science. When executing experiments involving animal models, the animal’s environment can have a dramatic influence on the results. We demonstrated how variations in bedding could lead to significant differences in maternal care and abnormal anxiety, e.g., behavior in their offspring that persists throughout adulthood.

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