Monthly Archives: April 2012

Born To Be Destitute: Capital Transfer and Intergenerational Transfer of Poverty

Augus Surachman,
Professor Hartoyo*,
Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/surachman.html

Abstract: This research was conducted to analyze the intergenerational transfer of poverty in two-generation families and to examine the mechanism of the transfer by utilizing intergenerational capital transfer model, especially human capital and material capital. This research revealed that parental investment behavior on children was the determining factor in the second-generation family’s welfare. The research estimated the chance of second-generation family with father coming from poor family was 38 times higher to be poor than second-generation family with father coming from not poor origin family. Status mobility from poor to not poor could be due to education (for man) and marital factor (for woman).

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Relational Self-Construal and the Process of Forming New Relationships

Shawn Butcher,
Dr. Jonathan S. Gore*,
Eastern Kentucky University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/butcher.html

Abstract: The present study examined the relationship between relational self-construal and the types of questions and answers that an individual gives upon first meeting another person. We predicted that a participant’s relational self-construal would positively correlate with the amount of relational questions asked and negatively with the amount of superficial questions asked, as well as positively correlating with word count, relational answers, and emotional answers. A negative correlation between participant’s relational self-construal and factual answers was also predicted. One hundred fourteen participants were asked to select 10 questions from a list of questions that would allow them to get to know someone. Participants then either worked alone or with a partner during which time they asked and recorded the answers given. Participants’ questions were evaluated as being either superficial or relational and answers were evaluated as being emotional, relational, or factual. The results yielded no support between an individual’s relational self-construal and the types of questions asked; however, relational self-construal was positively associated with the amount of emotional and relational answers given and negatively associated with factual answers.

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My Space: Reactions to Proxemic Violations in an Interview Setting

Robert Bitting, Luke Brenneman, Brianne Jewett, Ryan Schnurr,
Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/bitting.html

Abstract: This study explored the reactions of interviewees to proxemic violations of an interviewer. Participants were interviewed on an innocuous topic by a male interviewer who progressively positioned himself closer to them. Reactions of interviewees were recorded and analyzed according to gender differences and concepts from literary research.

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