Monthly Archives: January 2012

E-Content Management and Development: Hijacking Plagiarism on the High Sea of Cyber-Intellectualism

Victor Counted, West Africa Theological Seminary (Nigeria)

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v11/counted.html

Abstract Daily, we see the unethical hijacking of e-contents in the “high sea” of intellectualism–of materials, literature, and other resources of worth–without regard to its original proponent. Upon reflection on the ethics of ownership and place of ethics in research, we seek a solution to this act of infringement, which for centuries has been of knotty problem. The Internet with its TCP/IP network protocols can facilitate data transmission and easily scan selected parts of works that become instances of plagiarism.

My motivation is personal, having being a victim of this villainous act. A few years ago, I purchased a book that had interspersed in it the exact ideas I posted on my blog. For this reason, I answer some ethical questions, share perspectives, and then proffer possible solutions that could be helpful in curbing this intellectual fraud.

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SAT Coaching in Unlikely Places: Offering Achievement Test Preparation to Students with Academic and Economic Need

Tracey Cannova, Mary Beth Schaefer*, St. John’s University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/cannova.html

Abstract: After studying the literature on the effects of SAT preparation programs, it was found that students who received coaching had more positive outcomes. No study considered the affective effects among students who received some kind of formal SAT preparation nor did the studies address how to increase access to preparation programs to serve the needs of lower-income populations. The authors of the present study designed and implemented a small-scale SAT program to deliver preparation to an underserved community and measured its impact on students’ achievement scores and attitude towards the SAT. This study confirmed the findings of other studies in that students who were coached exhibited higher achievement scores; additionally, it was found that students who were coached developed a more positive attitude towards the SAT and college.

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The Emotional Impact of Workplace Bullying

Alexander M. Fireman, Alecia M. Santuzzi*, Department of Psychology, Northern Illinois University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/fireman.html

Abstract: The following study examined the prevalence and impact of workplace bullying. To achieve this goal, a survey was administered through Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk (n =122). The study set out to determine if workplace-bullying experiences could be correlated with other emotional states. Positive correlations were found among workplace bullying intensity, workplace incivility, and paranoia, while a negative correlation was discovered between workplace bullying intensity and self-esteem.

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Not All Cultural Misunderstandings are Negative: The Inadequacy of the Concept of Ethnocentrism

Jordan Hyde, Alex North, Brigham Young University – Idaho

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v11/hyde.html

Abstract: This qualitative study examined the extent to which expatriates accommodate local worldviews and the implications of such accommodation on intercultural relations. Participants were interviewed and transcripts were analyzed and coded for themes. Most participants did not accommodate local worldviews per se, but most recognized the ecological benefits of the other cultural traditions. Various factors influenced the degree to which they accommodated local perspectives. Those who empathized with local perspectives expressed more positive relations with the host culture.

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