Monthly Archives: May 2011

The Effects of Divorce on the Perception of Cohabitation

Whitney Hacker, Berea College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/hacker.html

Abstract This study examines the relationship between a college students’ experience with the divorce of a parent or guardian and their perception of cohabitation. Results of this study show that a majority of students who have experienced parental divorce feel that cohabitation is circumstantial, as opposed to being purely positive or negative. However, a majority of those students who have negative feelings toward cohabitation are also those students who have not experienced the divorce of a parent. Although intervening variables may have existed, the study supported the position that college students who have experienced the divorce of a parent have a different perception of cohabitation than college students who have not experienced the divorce of a parent.

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Birth Order and Impact on College Major Choice

Jennifer Cramer, Ashley Dilling, Brittney Hockemeyer, Joshua Nicholson, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/cramer.html

Abstract This study examines the correlation of birth order and choice of college major. It was hypothesized that ones position of birth within the family has an impact on college major choice. Participants were juniors and seniors from a small liberal arts university located in the Midwest. These participants completed a web-based survey consisting of questions about family constellations and college information. We used a χ² test to analyze the data. After collecting and analyzing the data using several crosstabulations, we were unable to support our hypothesis.

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Impostor Phenomenon and Females’ Self-Esteem, GPA, and Relationship with Mother

Melissa R. Garwick, Annalise C. Ford, Jennifer L. Hughes*, Agnes Scott College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/garwick.html

Abstract The Impostor Phenomenon (IP) has been found mainly in high-achieving women in academic and career fields. Clance and Imes (1978) were the first researchers to identify this phenomenon. For this study, we examined self-esteem levels, grade point average (GPA), and participants’ relationship with their mother. We collected data using an Internet survey taken by 401 female undergraduate and graduate students whose ages ranged from 17 to 42. As hypothesized, females’ relationship with their mother was inversely related to their IP score. However, self-esteem and GPA were not significantly related to females’ IP score. These findings caution mothers to be careful about how they develop their relationship with their daughters.

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A Study of Attendees’ Motivations: Oxford Film Festival

Taylor Thomas, Young Hoon Kim*

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/thomas.html

Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore the motivations of attendees at the Oxford Film Festival, held in Oxford, MS. One hundred nine surveys were collected, and factor analysis was used to group 10 individual motivators into 3 factors. The three factors were Togetherness in Good Environments, Money, and Film Itself.

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The Effects of Pre-Bedtime Routine on Sleep

Aubrey Garner, Julie Manges, Raquel Anderson, Huntington University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/garner.html

Abstract Anecdotal evidence shows that activities in preparation for sleep affect certain characteristics of sleep, such as duration and quality. This study tests this evidence. According to the literature, when asking the question of whether pre-bedtime routine affects sleep characteristics, particularly of college students and professors, it was hypothesized that a structured pre-bedtime routine positively affects sleep characteristics. A web-based survey was distributed to college students and college professors to look into structure of pre-bedtime routine and sleep quality. Two Pearson r correlations and two t-tests were used to analyze the data. After completion of this study, there was no significance found between the variables of pre-bedtime routine and sleep characteristics.

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Does Exergaming Achieve the Same Levels of Fitness Intensity as Unstructured Activity?

Courtney A. Graham, Rachel M. Perron, Jamie R. Feldman, Eric E. Hall*, Elon University, Elon, NC

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v10/graham.html

Abstract Exercise games were developed by video game designers to combat sedentary behavior. The purpose of this study was to explore the intensity levels of exergaming in comparison to an unstructured physical activity program. Sixteen female participants (Mean age=9.4 ± 1.0 years) spent twenty minutes in unstructured physical activity, monitored by a mentor, and twenty minutes playing exercise games on the Nintendo Wii™. Based on our findings, it can be concluded that only the WiiFit exergame can achieve intensity levels comparable to unstructured activity.

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Individualistic and Structural Attributions of Poverty in the LDS Population

Alex North, Arwen Behrends, Kayla Green, Luis Oquendo,Tamra Dison, Justin Larson,Yohan Delton*, Brigham Young University-Idaho

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v10/north.html

Abstract A significant amount of research has been conducted on the lay attributions of poverty and the subsequent influence on helping behavior. The purpose of this study was to further the work on how religion mediates poverty attributions by extending the research into a LDS population. As the result of the high conservative influence in the LDS sample, we hypothesized that the individualistic attribution would be the more popular choice. There were 144 BYU-Idaho students that filled out an Internet survey. This survey used a five-point scale to measure students’ attributions of poverty. A factor analysis revealed six factors that accounted for 62.9 percent of the variance, while an ANOVA test showed that individualistic and structural attributions were used more than fatalistic attributions to explain poverty. Our hypothesis was only partially supported. It appears that religious influence reduced the effect that political orientation exerted on poverty attribution. A limitation in our study is our relatively homogenous sample. Future research needs to be conducted to flesh out why religion exerts influence on poverty attributions.

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Persistent Homelessness in Boston, Massachusetts

Katie R. Petrik, Julian D. Murphy, University of Notre Dame

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v10/petrik.html

Abstract Although hundreds of institutions exist in Boston with the mission of alleviating homelessness, over seven thousand homeless individuals remain, many of whom live in the streets year round. Our primary concern is with these individuals, labeled as the most vulnerable and at-risk homeless. We investigated through observation, survey, and interview, and with the support of Pine Street Inn’s Street Outreach Crew, the main reasons those still living on the streets are either unable or unwilling to seek help from a shelter. The primary reasons appear to be aversion to shelter rules and conditions, substance abuse, psychological disorders, and the ability to survive alone. A possible resolution to persistent homelessness may address individuals’ social needs by offering respect and dignity along with shelter.

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The Horn of Africa in a Bipolar World – The Cold War as the Origin of the Somalia Crisis

Philipp Schulz, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v10/schulz.html

Abstract Somalia on the Horn of Africa is what we nowadays describe as the “world’s most failed state (Foreign Policy, 2010), characterized as a symbol of UN peacekeeping failure, escalating piracy, and thus a resulting state of anarchy.

A now more twenty years-long lasting civil war has left the country destroyed, which is an irony in a world overcrowded with centrifugal figures, because Somalia has a society as homogenous as almost any other post-colonial country. But what lead to the fact that Somalia destroyed itself? Among different specific internal and external historical, political, and social factors, the bipolar system during the Cold War significantly marked the state on the Gulf of Aden.

Although Peter Schwab (1978) defined the general Horn of Africa as “a major geopolitical area of the world” (p. 6), it became evident that Somalia but also Ethiopia had only little chance of escaping the rivalry coming along with the “superpower competition” (Parsons, 1995, p. 198) during the Cold War. Until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 regional development-especially on the Horn of Africa–has been governed by the performance of the East-West-Conflict’s main players.

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Parental Relationships and Family Cohesiveness as Influencing Adolescent Eating

Golshid Fadakar, Melinda Blackman*, California State University, Fullerton

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/fadakar.html

Abstract The purpose of the study was to examine the eating behaviors of adolescents, while investigating how influential parental relationships and family cohesiveness were on the adolescent’s behavior. This study consisted of 81 adolescents, 59 females and 22 males, from Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe Springs, California. This research indicated that strong family cohesion and individual parental relationships play a significant factor in healthy adolescent eating.

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