Monthly Archives: April 2011

College Students’ Perceptions of Fitness and Body Type in Interpersonal Relationships

Melissa MacDonald, Kylee Thetford, Nicole Schueneman, Justin Daleiden,
Cameron Miller, Jennifer T. Edwards*, Tarleton State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v10/edwards.html

Abstract The purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of college students about a person’s body type in interpersonal relationships. The researchers investigated the stereotypes placed on college students and their level of physical appearance. In order to reach the goal of the study, the researchers offered the following research question: “What are college students’ perceptions of a person’s body type when beginning interpersonal relationships on a college campus?”

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The Economic Connections between China and the U.S.: How to Benefit Both Players through International Trading

Ruby Yanjie Chen, Robert Guang Tian*, Medaille College

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v10/chen.html

Abstract China and the U.S. are connected economically and help each other with trade, which is a big source of income and a huge benefit for countries with a shortage of certain materials. Nowadays, the U.S. has a very high deficit with China, greater than any other country. It is important to remain on good sides with China, because we can become allies together. Also, China is a very fast growing country. We need to keep up with China with new technology and devices. China is a very important trading partner to the United States.

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An Ethnographic Perspective of ISU Students’ Decision to Drink Bottled Water: A College Drinking Problem?

Maria Cristina Morales Munoz, Johanna Haas*, Illinois State University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v10/munoz.html

Abstract: This research used an ethnography to analyze the consumption practice of bottled water at Illinois State University. Students were surveyed, interviewed, and observed to better understand the cultural meaning behind branding bottled water. The data revealed habit, convenience, hyperindividualism, and health to be the most crucial reasons students at ISU consume bottled water. The purpose of this study is to support the decrease of bottled water consumption at collages by encouraging collegiate level institutions to educate students about their own consumption practices.

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Transform the Boundaries: Intercultural Communication in the Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Chen Sheng, Wesleyan College

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v10/sheng.html

Abstract In this research, I intend to reveal the Eastern cultural elements of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, use ideological criticism and intercultural communication theory to analyze the rhetorical meanings of those elements, discover the strategies that Maya Lin used to make Eastern cultural elements appealing to the predominantly Western audience, and discuss the contribution of this research to rhetorical theory.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial attracts and moves many visitors of various backgrounds and with different experiences related to the Vietnam War. The designer of the memorial, Maya Lin, managed to appeal to virtually all audiences through this initially controversial design. A first-generation Chinese American, Lin’s cultural identity became part of the controversy–yet, it also largely contributed to the success of the memorial. Three features of this memorial are identified that make Eastern cultural elements appealing to a Western society: (a) It invites visitors to think through the change of time and space; (b) It reflects the polarization of life and death with subtle connections between the two; (c) It provides space for visitors to mourn as individuals but also focuses on the feelings that they share as a group. Such characteristics enable Eastern culture to be appealing to Western mainstream culture; they also suggest that intercultural communication enriches the meanings of a visual image not only aesthetically but also rhetorically.

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