Monthly Archives: May 2010

Cutting the Fat on Healthcare: An Investigation of Preventive Healthcare and the Fight on Obesity

Maggie Bertucci, Alex Miller, Stephen Jaggi, Steven Wilding, Brigham Young University

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/bertucci.html

Abstract The recently passed Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 summons a $940 billion budget focused primarily on providing health care coverage for every American. In 1965, the government had a similar goal, which led to the implementation of Medicare and Medicaid. Unfortunately, these programs ended up costing ten times what was originally estimated. Perhaps this was partially due to the rising rates of disease in recent years, particularly obesity. In order for the government to stay within its current budgetary limitations and for America to sustain long-term control over its health concerns, we feel that there should be a shift towards more preventive care instead of primarily focusing on reactive care (treating the symptoms). We set out to discover if preventive care is more cost-effective than reactive care, limiting our focus strictly to rising obesity rates and its associated costs. In this paper we summarize the current literature on the subject and discuss both the advantages and difficulties of establishing a more preventive approach toward healthcare. We conclude that prevention would extend quality years of life to more Americans at a lower cost than when primarily implementing reactive care. Our main goal in writing this article is to raise awareness of this potential. To illustrate this, we analyzed three preventive approaches: school-based programs, dietary restrictions, and increased exercise. These three examples are effective at reducing obesity and cost-efficient. Together, they serve as the general framework of preventive care upon which more advanced and specific programs can be discussed. 

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The Amish: Microenterprises and a Changing Society

Chelsea Bailey, Elmira College

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/bailey.html

This paper is an attempt to gain a sense of how Amish society is reacting to increasing dependence on technology in mainstream society, especially in the agricultural realm. It examines the changes that have been taking place in Amish society as larger American society increasingly embraces modernization and the Amish are forced to adopt new ways of living in order to survive economically. It explores the positive and negative attributes of entrance into the business world in terms of the perpetuation of the Amish cultural beliefs and values and speculates as to where the changes might lead their culture.

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Qualifications of Dietary Managers in Senior Living Communities

Kathryn Henry, Chelsea Schenck, Nina Collins*, Bradley University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/henry.html

Abstract According to a review of literature, one of determinants of satisfaction for seniors in assisted or other long-term care living arrangements is the quality of food and food service (Howells, 2007; Amarantos, Martinez, & Dwyer, 2001). Part of the determining factor of satisfaction is the management of any food service operation, including preparation of food. This study examined the minimum qualifications of dietary managers in Illinois compared with telephone interview responses from senior living telephone interviews. Results indicated that a majority of participants were unaware of the qualifications for dietary managers in Illinois and very few participants in the survey required qualifications beyond the minimum state requirements for dietary managers.

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Sources and Outlets of Stress among University Students: Correlations between Stress and Unhealthy Habits

Jacqueline Britz, Eric Pappas*, James Madison University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/britz.html

Abstract This research into stress assessed the sources and outlets of stress among a group of 124 college freshmen at James Madison University. Results revealed that a high degree and frequency of stress exists among the participants, with over 50 percent of students reporting high levels of stress. The major causes of stress were found to be academic workload and time management. High stress levels among participants correlated with many unhealthy behaviors, including compromised quality of diet and decreased quantity of sleep. 

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