The Perceived Influence of Family Togetherness on Junior High School Students

Jamie Ann Hernandez, The Master’s College

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/hernandez.html

Abstract Current research suggests that family leisure has encouraged the involvement and interaction with children in a way that fulfills both parental and social discourse. The purpose of the study was to observe how pre-teens from the ages of 12 to 14 are impacted by the relationships they have with their family environments inside and outside of the home. The survey instrument observed the impact of family involvement on the maturation of pre-teens (12-14 years of age). The results reflected that families are incorporating planned activities on either a weekly or monthly basis and/or actively discussing family-related plans. In contrast, there was a significant lack of whole family participation. As shown through various current research and the results of this study, family togetherness and positive developmental influence are concepts that should be linked.

Introduction When time is spent in a setting embraced by the welcoming comfort of another person, a lasting impression on emotional, physical, and mental behaviors is constructed. In the development of a family relationship, the establishment of unity that allows the creation of individuality is essential to the quality of a young life. According to Susan M. Shaw of Waterloo University and Don Dawson of the University of Ottawa (2001), in regard to the creation of family unity, the character of children is developed by a “sense of family” that would “reflect the idea of the family as an island of security and togetherness in a somewhat hostile world, which may interfere with the family values and family cohesion” (Shaw & Dawson, 2001, p. 225). Throughout a number of studies conducted by Gottlieb, Whittaker and Garnarino “social support provides evidence that quality relationships can mediate the effects of crises and can promote positive mental health” (LeCroy & Winston, 1988, p. 138). Through the engagement of the family unit the emotional, physical, social, and mental performance of a child can be significantly influential in the betterment of society and quality of life.

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/hernandez.html