Monthly Archives: February 2010

Lingo, Loyalty, & Lambaste: The E-Zines of the Early French Hacker Scene

Kevin Gotkin, Rachel Ward*
New York University

Full Paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/gotkin.html

“This is our world now . . . the world of the electron and the switch, the beauty of the baud.”
-The Mentor

Introduction: Shortly after his arrest in 1986, “The Mentor” wrote a short piece for the American hacker e-zine, Phrack, entitled “The Conscience of a Hacker.” We can only assume the writer is a man because his penname masks everything about his true identity, including the arrest that apparently led him to write the article. In the piece, he tells stories of his childhood, of discovering the computer, and of reading newspaper articles about amateur hackers getting arrested. The piece is very short with only a handful of paragraphs that barely stretch to a second printed page, but at the end of each paragraph he repeats five words taken from the admonishing voices he hears all around: “Damn kids. They’re all alike” (1). Through his piece, The Mentor allows us a glimpse into some of the most personal parts of a hacker’s mind.

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Directed Forgetting of Real-Life Events in School-Age Children

Michael Anthony Cole Jr., Holger B. Elischberger*
Albion College

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/cole.html

Abstract In the present study, participants from 1st, 3rd, and 5th grade completed two simple science activities. A researcher instructed each participant to remember one of the activities and forget the other. Children’s memory for both activities was assessed after a two-week delay. Data analyses yielded a slight age-related increase in directed forgetting (DF) of the two activities, but overall levels of DF were low. In contrast, the trend for word list DF established in the literature was replicated. This pattern of results is interpreted as a reflection of the context sensitivity of cognitive processes in children.

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Psychoneuroimmunology: An Analysis of HIV/AIDS and Cancer

Seth R. Batten, Martha Upchurch*
Transylvania University

Full Paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/batten.html

Abstract: Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is the study of how psychological factors such as stress and depression can affect the immune system through the nervous system. This review examines PNI in relation to HIV/AIDS and cancer. It discusses the possible mechanisms through which these diseases are affected by stress and depression as well as known PNI treatments. It concludes by discussing limitations of the research as well as where PNI may go in the future. 

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Glimpse into Simulation and Critical Thinking: A Pilot Study Comparing Utah and Ecuador

Katrina Duncan, Patricia K. Ravert*

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/duncan.html

Abstract Interviews in Utah and Ecuador explored the perceptions of simulation and critical thinking. Three themes emerged during analysis. High fidelity simulation can be used to develop critical thinking and is used in many Utah nursing education programs, whereas in Ecuador simulation use is in the early stages.

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