Monthly Archives: May 2009

Textile Arts and Handcraft Participation in the Florida Parishes Region of Louisiana

Kristin McNab, Debbie Johnson*
Southeastern Louisiana University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/mcnab.html

Abstract The purpose of this study was to document textile arts and handcraft participation in the Florida Parishes region of Louisiana. Six women (of varying ages) participated in the interview-survey procedure; each interview took thirty minutes to one hour to complete. The study primarily helped to gain knowledge about five important factors related to arts and handcraft. First, the questions in the interview process were specifically directed to people who sew (or perform other handcraft techniques) on a regular basis. Second, the interview collected the demographics of the women and when they started partaking in arts/handcraft activities. Third, participants were asked to summarize creative activities over time. Fourth, the interview inquired about skills for specific arts/handcraft techniques. Fifth, participants were asked about level of enjoyment of handcraft activities.

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Narcissism and Levels of Social Competence

Megan Fulton, Shalicia Holman
Huntington University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/vurc/v8/fulton.html

Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between narcissism and social competence. The population for the study consisted of undergraduate students, ranging in age from 17 to 23. The Selfism Scale (Phares & Erskine, 1984) was used to measure levels of narcissism, and the Miller Social Intimacy Scale (MSIS) (Miller & Lefcourt, 1982) was used to measure levels of social competence. Using a Pearson r, the correlation for the two variables was -0.236; thus no statistically significant correlation was found. However, when three additional responses that included missing data were added, the data were statistically significant. Further research should be conducted to determine the relationship between narcissism and social competence.

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Dual-Earner Couples: The Impact of Work-Family Spillover on Marital Satisfaction

Sarah A. Cherry, Samantha J. Sutorius,Emily L. Zimmerman
Huntington University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/cherry.html 

Abstract The present study examined the relationship between couples’ combined hours in gainful employment and volunteer activities and marital satisfaction. It was hypothesized that dual-earner heterosexual married couples who report a greater number of hours spent in gainful employment and volunteer activities would report lower levels of marital satisfaction. The Comprehensive Marital Satisfaction Scale (Mehrabian, 2005) was administered by convenience sampling to 30 couples in the researchers’ home churches and workplaces in Indiana. The data were analyzed using a Pearson r statistic and found that r equaled .01. No statistical significance was found; therefore the null hypothesis was retained. Future studies should consider a multi-variate approach to control for unemployment, children, and remarriage, among other confounding variables.

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The Effect of Introversion and Extraversion on the Fear of Negative Evaluation

Melissa Keighin, Kelsey Butcher, Michael Darnell
Huntington University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/keighin.html 

Abstract The present study examined the relationship between introversion and extroversion personality types and the fear of negative evaluation. Students attending a small Christian-affiliated liberal arts university were selected through convenience sampling to complete the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale. It was hypothesized that individuals who were classified as introverted would have a greater fear of negative evaluation than individuals who were classified as extraverted. The results were measured using a two-tailed independent t-test with a significance level of 0.05. The null hypothesis was rejected and a statistically significant relationship was found between introverted individuals and fear of negative evaluation. The hypothesis was supported, affirming that individuals who are assessed to be extroverted will tend to have a lower fear of negative evaluation score than those who are introverted.

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The Influence of Media Marketing on Adolescent Girls

Erica Laurén Sanders
The Master's College

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/sanders.html 

Abstract Current research suggests that “mass media (TV, movies, magazines, internet) pervade the everyday lives of people living in Western societies, and undoubtedly one of the effects of such media saturation is the pervasive transmission of societal beauty ideals” (Tiggemann, 2006, para. 2). The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of media marketing on adolescent girls from the ages of 16-19. The survey instrument was distributed to students who were enrolled at the Academy of the Canyons located in Santa Clarita, California, during the spring of 2007. STATPAK was employed to examine the data, and the One-Dimensional Chi-square test was used for data analysis. The findings of the study yielded some significant results. The conclusions of this research suggest that media marketing does influence adolescent girls more than adolescent girls may be aware.

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The Correlation of Self-Esteem and Perceived Social Support

Allison Budd, Callie Buschman, Lucas Esch
Huntington University

Full manuscript: http:www.kon.org/urc/v8/budd.html 

Abstract The present study examined this relationship with a sample from a small liberal arts university population. It was hypothesized that as perceived social support increased, individual self-esteem would also increase. Participants were full-time undergraduate students between the ages of 18 and 25 and were chosen by convenience sampling. The Index of Self-Esteem (Hudson, 1982) and the Social Support Appraisals Scale (Vaux, Phillips, Holley, Thompson, Williams, & Stewart, 1986) were completed for examination. The data were analyzed using the Pearson-r coefficient. Using a .05 level of significance and 38 degrees of freedom, the r was 0.32. A correlation of 0.82 was found signifying a strong relationship between self-esteem and perceived social support. This supports the findings of Gecas (1972), Aberson (1999), and Sanaktekin and Sunar (2008). A larger, more representative sample size may be beneficial for future studies.

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The Relationship Between Credit Load and Depression

Joel A. Makin, Cassie R. Mansheim, Cassandra N. Dyar,
Huntington University

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/v8/makin.html

Abstract This study explored the relationship between credit load and depression among full-time undergraduate students between the ages of 18-24 at a Midwest university. It was predicted that those with a higher credit load would score higher on the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (Zung, 1965). The number of credits for the past school year and the score from the Zung scale were compared, and the correlation between credit load and depression were measured using the Pearson r. Using a .05 level of significance and 45 degrees of freedom, the resultant r was -0.325, which was then compared to a critical value of 0.288. The findings were statistically significant. Contrary to prior research and expectations, a negative correlation was found.

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Age and the Human Ability to Decode Words

Sonya Davey
Thomas S. Wootton High School, Rockville, MD

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/highschool/davey.html

Abstract What is the age when reading fluency in a certain population begins? It is not only important to know the reading fluency starting age of individuals with learning disabilities in reading but also to compare reading fluency of students at one school versus another. Reading fluency is the ability to read text, not just accurately but also quickly and effortlessly. This study describes a method of determining a reading fluency starting age. Based upon the data obtained from the present research, it was determined that the reading fluency starting age was the age at which the reading fluency score on the alphabetical test versus ages of the population showed a maximum.

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The Effect of the Olfactory Sense and Handedness on Memory

Ajleeta Sangtani
Southview High School, Sylvania, Ohio

Full manuscript: http://www.kon.org/urc/highschool/sangtani.html

Abstract
The project focused on creating engrams, or neural connections, to effectively retrieve information and find the connection between handedness and memory. The project consisted of seventy-five mixed gender and handedness ninth grade students who studied material for forty-two minutes and took a test two weeks later, each time with a scent or lack thereof, depending on the condition. Results for the olfactory sense part and handedness supported the null hypotheses (R = 0.027, p =.14). Although scores were low overall, results possibly suggested that the scent had a positive effect during study time but not during testing time; further research will need to confirm this.

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URC Publishes High School Research Journal

The Undergraduate Research Community, sponsored by Kappa Omicron Nu, has introduced a new publication for high school research manuscripts. See http://www.kon.org/urc/urc_research_journal_highschool.html. Further information can be found at this link. Manuscripts should be submitted electronically to the Managing Editor, Dorothy I. Mitstifer. This new publication is an opportunity for URC to encourage research conducted in the human sciences at the high school level with the hope that beginning researchers will continue their efforts during their undergraduate education.