Monthly Archives: January 2009

The Balance of Power, Ego & Aggression: Deprivation leads to Delinquency

Ozlem Yuksel-Sokmen
CUNY, John Jay College of Criminal Justice 

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v7/yuksel-sokmen-3.html »

The famous German Psychoanalyst Jung, who with Freud extensively analyzed the ego of humans, said in 1916, "Children are born with the desire to exercise power over people and things about them" (Oxford English Dictionary, 2007). This notion leads to the complex view of power that the drive for power is derived from a so called “power instinct.” This means that at the start of its life, an infant has to create an ego, or as Adler (developed in Identity Psychology) called it, an “I.” In accomplishing the prime achievement, the infant uses power for the first time to survive. The infant demands food with a mere cry and thus is able to show its potentiality to develop an ego. The infant's use of crying for survival shows how powerful he is because its existential need is triggered by an inborn instinct…

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Effects of Exercise on Ejection Fraction, Arrhythmias, Dyspnea, and Functional Capacity in Congestive Heart Failure Patients

Mario Mitkov
University of California at Davis

Full paper: http://www.kon.org/urc/v7/mitkov.html » 

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) accounts for about a quarter of a million deaths a year, and currently its prevalence among the U.S. population is 4.8 million (1). CHF occurs when the heart cannot meet the demands of the body. The symptoms are breathlessness and fatigue due to a build up of fluid in and around the lungs. The failing heart inflates like a water balloon and, over time, gets stretched out to the point where it becomes a flimsy sac saturated with blood. If this sac is agitated with vigorous exercise it can, in some cases, fail.

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