Adaptive Reuse of Rural Schools & the Effects on Community & Quality of Life

Hillary L’Ecuyer, Kansas State University

Full report: www.kon.org/urc/v13/lecuyer.html

Abstract: Access to community amenities is often restricted for rural Americans (Beale & Johnson, 1998; Lapping, 2007). This condition is worsened when rural schools are shut down, causing a detriment to the community’s quality of life through the loss of social activities, an economic base, health programs, and an educational center (Diamond, 2013; Richardson, 2000; Lyson, 2002). With rural schools offering a variety of sizes of interior space, there is an opportunity to adapt these spaces for the specific needs of the community (Perkins & Bordwell, 2010; Lachky, 2010). A proposed strategy for planning and design options for school reuse is demonstrated to address the established rural issues and contribute to the quality of life for residents. Ideally, these strategies will conserve our planet’s limited building resources, and be a model for revitalized rural community development efforts across the nation.

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BaiFaXiangQin: Why and How?

Wong Wei Mei, Central China Normal University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v13/wongweimei.html

Abstract: Since 2004, the proliferation of Marriage Markets has made BaiFaXiangQin an attractive alternative for parents that are anxious and eager to help their single children find a suitable match for marriage. This paper discusses the possible cultural and financial reasons behind the increasing popularity of BaiFaXiangQin in mainland China and identifies the 5 steps used in BaiFaXiangQin to complete the marital selection process.

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On Violence as a Social Construct: An Experimental Design

Lukas Holschuh, University of East Anglia

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v13/holschuh.html

Abstract: This paper reviews theories on violence to establish whether there may be cultures that are more violent than others. Violence is examined out of a socio-psychological perspective. According to the four different levels of analysis in social psychology (Doise, 1980), an experimental design is proposed that accounts for the different theories presented. It is argued that violence is a social construct rooted in the potential for violence in the structure and culture of a society. The concept of violence is broken down into three different categories as defined by Galtung (1990): cultural violence, structural violence, and direct violence. Different theories on violence and aggression are presented. Direct violence is conceptualised as the reflection of the psyche of a society in the minds of men, of its cultural belief systems and structural integrity.

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The Effects of Raising the Minimum Wage on the Hospitality Industry

Emily Carpenter, Bradley University

Full paper: www.kon.org/urc/v13/carpenter.html

Abstract: President Obama broached the subject of raising the minimum wage in the United States, and this paper investigates the impacts of the increase, especially on the hospitality industry. The pros and cons of raising the minimum wage are discussed in terms of employees and employers. The minimum wage will eventually be increased, knowing the benefits and challenges associated with doing so could help managers prepare for the ensuing changes.

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DUI Court: A Cross Case Examination of High Risk DUI Offenders

Tyler Reck, Lebanon Valley College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/reck.html

Abstract: A considerable amount of evidence has been found showing that treatment courts that identify “high risk” and “high need” offenders—those at risk for failure in standard correctional rehabilitation programs (Marlowe, 2012)—are significantly more effective than those who do not. A local DUI Court program had been operating without risk profiling. The purpose of this study was to assist the program in building an easy to implement risk profile assessment strategy using existing measures, including GAGE, mental health status, and stress. Implications for improved targeting of high risk/high need cases are discussed.

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Artifactual Communication: A Modern Approach to Understanding Communication through Nonverbal Artifacts

Keven J. Rudrow, Valdosta State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/rudrow.html

Abstract: The aim of this article is to explore phenomenology as a method in explaining the usage of contemporary artifacts as a byproduct of cultural materialism in a modern approach to artifactual communication. This article seeks to draw correlations between materialism and artifactual communication (i.e., communicating through the use of artifacts), by assessing research on materialism and artifacts (e.g., color, environment, and clothing), and how it plays an intricate role in nonverbal and interpersonal communication as well as physical attractiveness. Rejecting the notion that artifactual communication is enrooted in sexism, racism, or stereotypes, this article seeks to give credence to approximations while rejecting the notion of absolutisms when decoding artifactual messages. Based on this study we can draw a number of conclusions as supported by previous research as well as the qualitative analysis conducted in this research. We conclude that artifactual communication, among other results, would be worthy of further study, particularly on its influence on nonverbal and interpersonal communication.

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Baseline Trauma Symptomatology Decreases Likelihood of Drug Court Graduation of Female Offenders

Mara J. Richman, Kalamazoo College, University of South Florida
Kathleen Moore*, Blake Barrett*, Scott Young*, Kalamazoo College

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/richman.html

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess mental health and trauma symptoms as predictors of drug court graduation among female offenders arrested and charged with prescription drug related offenses. Findings from a logistic regression demonstrated that, after controlling for baseline substance use, higher levels of trauma symptomatology significantly decreased likelihood of drug court graduation. Current results revealed female drug court offenders arrested and charged with prescription drug-related offenses with increased trauma symptomatology may need a more comprehensive baseline assessment and a greater level of trauma-informed clinical programming.

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An Examination of Americans’ Time Spent in Financial Management

MaryPat Peeples, Melissa J. Wilmarth*, University of Alabama

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/peeples.html

Abstract: In-depth analysis of individual time use and comparison of time use and finances as problems within financial management can be addressed. The 2012 panel of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) was utilized to investigate how minutes spent in financial management varied by demographic characteristics: education, gender, race, if children are present in the household, marital status, income, and employment status. On average, Americans spent 1.86 minutes (SD=18.24) in financial management daily (N=12,443). Differences in minutes spent in financial management were tested by characteristic via one-way ANOVAs and t-tests. Results indicated that time spent in financial management varies with the presence of children in the household, marital status, education, and employment status, but not by gender, race, or income level.

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Mother-Child Attachment and Peer Social Competence in Unacquainted and Acquainted Peers

Elissa Prado Gonzalez, University of Texas at Austin

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/gonzalez.html

Abstract: The impact of mother-child attachment on the development of peer interactions of toddlers was examined longitudinally. To determine the level of attachment security, the mothers completed the Q-set assessment. The toddlers ranged in age from 2 years 3 months to 3 years 7 months and were initially unacquainted with each other. The toddlers were observed in the classroom setting at the beginning of the study and then were given 12 weeks to interact and become acquainted with each other. At the end of the 12 weeks, the toddlers were observed once again. Although attachment patterns did not predict the social interaction process of getting acquainted with peers, it did predict the development of the emotional regulation process when getting acquainted with peers. Secure attachment is related to less under regulation even when children do not know each other, and as they become acquainted, the more secure children are, the more likely they are to increase their emotion regulation. Gender differences were also analyzed. Attachment patterns were predictive of peer interactions in girls but not boys. When girls were first introduced to their peers, secure girls initiated more interactions. After girls were acquainted with their peers, secure girls were less under regulated and antisocial.

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Attitudes Toward Positive Developmental Assets of Students Attending a Rural Northeast Missouri Middle School

Alexis Hackett, Kaitlyn McManus, Kendra Woolman, Brandon Stewart, Truman State University

Full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/hackett.html

Abstract: Developmental Assets are 40 protective characteristics that help youth avoid risky health behaviors. The more assets youth have, the less likely they are to engage in risky health behaviors like drug use and violence. Youth from an area of a state with some of the highest proportions of substance abuse and violence were surveyed on their attitudes toward these positive developmental assets. Although substance abuse and violence is increasing as these respondents matriculate through school, their highest-scoring assets of positive values, positive identity, and social competencies may act as protective factors or buffers against their participation in these risky behaviors.

Read the full manuscript: www.kon.org/urc/v13/hackett.html